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150 HAM-D6 Outcomes in a Randomized, Controlled Trial Evaluating the Utility of Combinatorial Pharmacogenomics in Depression

  • Boadie W. Dunlop (a1), Sagar V. Parikh (a2), Maitrey Patel (a3), Anthony J. Rothschild (a4), Michael E. Thase (a5), Charles DeBattista (a6), Charles R. Conway (a7), Brent P. Forester (a8), Richard C. Shelton (a9), Matthew Macaluso (a10), James Li (a3), Krystal Brown (a11), Lisa Brown (a3), Michael R. Jablonski (a3) and John F. Greden (a12)...

Abstract:

Background:

The Genomics Used to Improve DEpresssion Decisions (GUIDED) trial assessed outcomes associated with combinatorial pharmacogenomic (PGx) testing in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Analyses used the 17-item Hamilton Depression (HAM-D17) rating scale; however, studies demonstrate that the abbreviated, core depression symptom-focused, HAM-D6 rating scale may have greater sensitivity toward detecting differences between treatment and placebo. However, the sensitivity of HAM-D6 has not been tested for two active treatment arms. Here, we evaluated the sensitivity of the HAM-D6 scale, relative to the HAM-D17 scale, when assessing outcomes for actively treated patients in the GUIDED trial.

Methods:

Outpatients (N=1,298) diagnosed with MDD and an inadequate treatment response to >1 psychotropic medication were randomized into treatment as usual (TAU) or combinatorial PGx-guided (guided-care) arms. Combinatorial PGx testing was performed on all patients, though test reports were only available to the guided-care arm. All patients and raters were blinded to study arm until after week 8. Medications on the combinatorial PGx test report were categorized based on the level of predicted gene-drug interactions: ‘use as directed’, ‘moderate gene-drug interactions’, or ‘significant gene-drug interactions.’ Patient outcomes were assessed by arm at week 8 using HAM-D6 and HAM-D17 rating scales, including symptom improvement (percent change in scale), response (≥50% decrease in scale), and remission (HAM-D6 ≤4 and HAM-D17 ≤7).

Results:

At week 8, the guided-care arm demonstrated statistically significant symptom improvement over TAU using HAM-D6 scale (Δ=4.4%, p=0.023), but not using the HAM-D17 scale (Δ=3.2%, p=0.069). The response rate increased significantly for guided-care compared with TAU using both HAM-D6 (Δ=7.0%, p=0.004) and HAM-D17 (Δ=6.3%, p=0.007). Remission rates were also significantly greater for guided-care versus TAU using both scales (HAM-D6 Δ=4.6%, p=0.031; HAM-D17 Δ=5.5%, p=0.005). Patients taking medication(s) predicted to have gene-drug interactions at baseline showed further increased benefit over TAU at week 8 using HAM-D6 for symptom improvement (Δ=7.3%, p=0.004) response (Δ=10.0%, p=0.001) and remission (Δ=7.9%, p=0.005). Comparatively, the magnitude of the differences in outcomes between arms at week 8 was lower using HAM-D17 (symptom improvement Δ=5.0%, p=0.029; response Δ=8.0%, p=0.008; remission Δ=7.5%, p=0.003).

Conclusions:

Combinatorial PGx-guided care achieved significantly better patient outcomes compared with TAU when assessed using the HAM-D6 scale. These findings suggest that the HAM-D6 scale is better suited than is the HAM-D17 for evaluating change in randomized, controlled trials comparing active treatment arms.

Funding Acknowledgements:

Assurex Health, Inc.

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150 HAM-D6 Outcomes in a Randomized, Controlled Trial Evaluating the Utility of Combinatorial Pharmacogenomics in Depression

  • Boadie W. Dunlop (a1), Sagar V. Parikh (a2), Maitrey Patel (a3), Anthony J. Rothschild (a4), Michael E. Thase (a5), Charles DeBattista (a6), Charles R. Conway (a7), Brent P. Forester (a8), Richard C. Shelton (a9), Matthew Macaluso (a10), James Li (a3), Krystal Brown (a11), Lisa Brown (a3), Michael R. Jablonski (a3) and John F. Greden (a12)...

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