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132 Effects of Valbenazine on Depression and Suicidality in Adults With Tardive Dyskinesia: Pooled Results of 3 Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2018

Gary Remington
Affiliation:
Senior Scientist in the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute and Chief of the Schizophrenia Division at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Dao Thai-Cuarto
Affiliation:
Director of Clinical Drug Safety, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA
Joshua Burke
Affiliation:
Director, Biostatistics and Data Management, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA
Scott Siegert
Affiliation:
Executive Director, Head ofMedical Affairs, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA
Grace S. Liang
Affiliation:
Medical Director, Clinical, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA
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Abstract

Study Objectives

Valbenazine (INGREZZA; VBZ) is a novel and highly selective vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia (TD) in adults. The randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled trials of VBZ evaluated the treatment of TD in patients with a primary psychiatric diagnosis (schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder or mood disorder) while on concomitant psychiatric medications to manage these disorders. Since treatment-emergent depression and suicidal ideation/behavior are important clinical concerns in psychiatric patient populations, data from these trials were analyzed to assess the effectsof once-daily VBZ on depression and suicidality.

Methods

Data were pooled from three 6-week trials: KINECT (NCT01688037), KINECT 2 (NCT01733121), KINECT 3 (NCT02274558). Outcome data were analyzed in the safety population by pooled VBZ doses (40 mg, 80 mg) and PBO. Outcomes of interest included: treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) related to depression or suicidality; mean score change from baseline to Week 6 in the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS, for participants with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder) or the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS, for participants with mood disorder); and, worsening from baseline in Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) suicidal ideation scores. All outcomes were analyzed descriptively.

Results

There were 400 total participants in the pooled safety population; 286 participants had schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (40 mg, n=82; 80 mg, n=70; PBO, n=134) and 114 had a mood disorder (40 mg, n=28; 80 mg, n=42; PBO, n=44). Over one-third of participants had a lifetime history of suicidal ideation or behavior (40 mg, 45%; 80 mg, 39%; PBO, 37%). Few participants had a depression- or suicide-related TEAE, with no apparent differences between VBZ and PBO: suicidal ideation (40 mg, 3.6%; 80 mg, 0.9%; PBO, 2.2%); depression (40 mg, 0%; 80 mg, 1.8%; PBO, 1.1%); depressive symptom (40 mg, 0.9%; 80 mg, 0%; PBO, 0.6%); suicide attempt (40 mg, 0%; 80 mg, 0.9%; PBO, 0%). Mean changes from baseline to Week 6 in depression scale scores were generally small and similar across treatment groups: CDSS total score (40 mg, -0.5; 80 mg, -0.6; PBO, -0.3); MADRS total score (40 mg, -0.2; 80 mg, -1.7; PBO, 0.6). Few participants had a shift from no suicidal ideation at baseline (C-SSRS score=0) to any suicidal ideation during treatment (C-SSRS score=1-5): 40 mg, 3.9% (4/103); 80 mg, 0.9% (1/111); PBO, 2.9% (5/174).

Conclusion

Data from 3 double-blind, placebo-controlled trials indicate that once-daily VBZ treatment was not associated with a worsening in depression-related symptoms or an increased risk of suicidal ideation or behavior.

Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded by Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc.

Type
Abstracts
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2018 

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132 Effects of Valbenazine on Depression and Suicidality in Adults With Tardive Dyskinesia: Pooled Results of 3 Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials
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