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Surface properties and clay mineralogy of hydrated halloysitic soil clays. I: Existence of interlayer K+ specific sites

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2018

B. Delvaux
Affiliation:
IRFA/CIRAD, Unité de Chimie des Interfaces Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud, 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
A. J. Herbillon
Affiliation:
Unité de Science du Sol, Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud, 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
J. E. Dufey
Affiliation:
Section de Physico-chimie Minérale du Musée Royal de l'Afrique Centrale, Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud, 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
L. Vielvoye
Affiliation:
Centre de Pédologie Biologique, UP 6831 du CNRS associée à l'Université de Nancy I, BP 5, F-54501 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex, France

Abstract

Six deferrated clay (<2 µm) samples from the major B horizons of pedons derived from basaltic pyroclasts (Western Cameroon) were selected. These soil clays, which differ mainly in their contents of halloysite and kaolinite, represent the types of secondary constituents characteristic of different weathering stages in soils derived from such volcanic materials under humid tropical conditions. On these clays, Ca2+-K+ exchange equilibria were performed at pH 6 and 0·01 n chloride concentration. The amounts of K+ specific sites were estimated through a two-site modelling of the exchange isotherm curves. The total and external surface areas of the clays were measured by EGME retention and by the BET treatment of the N2 adsorption isotherm, respectively. Relative halloysite content was found to be directly related to all measured surface charge properties, i.e. CEC, amount of K+ specific sites, and total and internal surface areas. It was also observed that thermal collapse of halloysitic layers reduced both the CEC and the amount of K+ specific sites. All the surface properties observed point to the presence of smectite units intimately associated with halloysite in these clays. The results further suggest that the layer charge of these smectite units differs in different samples.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 1990

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