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Porcine oocyte maturation in vitro under different conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2007

Hu Jun-He
Affiliation:
Shaanxi Province Branch Center of National Stem Cell Engineering and Technology Center, Northwest Sci-tech University of Agriculture and Forestry, Yangling 712100, China Department of Life Science, YuLin College, YuLin 719000, China
Yang Chun-Rong
Affiliation:
Shaanxi Province Branch Center of National Stem Cell Engineering and Technology Center, Northwest Sci-tech University of Agriculture and Forestry, Yangling 712100, China
Dou Zhong-Ying
Affiliation:
Shaanxi Province Branch Center of National Stem Cell Engineering and Technology Center, Northwest Sci-tech University of Agriculture and Forestry, Yangling 712100, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The effects of hormone additions at various stages and different basic media, with or without serum, on porcine oocyte maturation in vitro were studied. The results showed that the rate of maturation was not significantly different with three different stages of hormone supplement; the rate of maturation on modified TCM199 medium (54.01%) was higher than that on TCM199 (46.16%) and (47.14%), but these differences were not significant; and the rate of maturation on serum-free medium (67.10%) was significantly higher than that on medium plus serum (52.22%). Therefore, modifed tissue culture medium 199 (mTCM199)+10I U/ml pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG)+10I U/ml human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)+2.5 IU/ml follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was a suitable medium for culture of porcine oocytes in vitro, and the rate of maturation was 67.10%.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © China Agricultural University and Cambridge University Press 2006

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