Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5bf98f6d76-r9mtw Total loading time: 0.201 Render date: 2021-04-20T11:46:03.106Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

PCR for the detection of the anti-herbicide genes in genetically modified organisms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2007

Xu Wen-Tao
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Huang Kun-Lun
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Deng Ai-Ke
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Luo Yun-Bo
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) containing anti-herbicide genes account for more than 75% of all GMO and the proportion is increasing. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has proved to be an invaluable tool for the specific and sensitive detection of genetically modified material in foodstuffs and PCR screening for the presence of transgenic components in food is becoming a routine method in modern food analysis. In this study, the five kinds of the anti-herbicide genes (bar, pat, cp4-epsps1, cp4epsps2 and gox) were examined by PCR in four kinds of genetically modified crops (soy, maize, cotton and rape). Results indicate that the method was sensitive, specific and credible, and that all genetically modified and approved crops containing the anti-herbicide genes can be examined by this method.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © China Agricultural University and Cambridge University Press 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

European Commission (2000a) Commission Regulation (EC) No. 49/2000 of the Commission amending Council Regulation (EC) 1139/98 of January 10, 2000, concerning the compulsory indication on the labeling of certain foodstuffs produced from genetically modified organisms of particulars other than those provided for in Directive 79/112/EEC, Off. Journal of European Communities L6: 1314.Google Scholar
European Commission (2000b) Commission Regulation (EC) No. 50/2000 of the Commission of January 10, 2000, concerning the labeling of foodstuffs and food ingredients containing additives and flavourings that have been genetically modified or have been produced from genetically modified organisms, Off. Journal of European Communities L6: 1517.Google Scholar
European Commission (2000c) Council Regulation (EC) No. 49/2000 of the European Parliament and of the council of January 10, 2000, Off. Journal of European Communities L006: 15.Google Scholar
Hideo, K, Yoichiro, S and Takeshi, M (2002) Novel reference molecules for quantitation of genetically modified maize and soybean. Food Composition and Additives 85(2): 10771089.Google Scholar
Huang, HY and Pan, TM (2004) Detection of genetically modified mazine MON810 and NK603 by mutiplex and real-time polymerase chain reaction methods. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 52: 32643268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
James, C (2002) Global Status of Commercialized Transgenic Crops: 2002. ISAAA (International Science for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications) Briefs 27.Google Scholar
James, C (2003) Global hectarage of GM crops in 2002. ISAAA (International Science for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications) Briefs 3(1): 25.Google Scholar
Matsuoka, T, Kuribara, H, Akiyama, H et al. , (2001) A multiplex PCR method of detecting recombinant DNAs from five lines of genetically modified maize. Journal of the Food Hygienic Society of Japan 42: 2432.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pan, LW, Chen, JH and Yu, DY (2004) Quantitative detection of genetically modified Roundup Ready canola in imported Candian canola. Journal of Agricultural Biotechnology 12(2): 152156.Google Scholar
Rogers, SO and Bendich, AJ (1985) Extraction of DNA from milligram amounts of fresh, herbarium and mummified plant tissues. Plant Molecular Biology 5: 6976.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Terry, CF, Shanahan, DJ, Ballam, LD, Harris, N, McDowell, DG and Parkes, HC (2002) Real-time detection of genetically modified soya using lightcycler and ABI 7700 platforms with TaqMan, scrpion, and sybr green I chemistries. Journal of AOAC International 85: 938944.Google ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 2 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 20th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

PCR for the detection of the anti-herbicide genes in genetically modified organisms
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

PCR for the detection of the anti-herbicide genes in genetically modified organisms
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

PCR for the detection of the anti-herbicide genes in genetically modified organisms
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *