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Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for PAT protein detection in genetically modified rape

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 March 2007

Xu Wen-Tao
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Huang Kun-Lun
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Deng Ai-Ke
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Luo Yun-Bo
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Nutrition Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We have developed and applied an immunoassay method to detect genetically modified (GM) rape containing phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT). The purified PAT was identified by Western blotting and enzymic activity analysis. The polyclonal antibody against purified PAT protein was obtained and purified by both a saturated ammonium sulphate method and protein A-Sepharose 4B. The sensitivity and cross-reactivity of the polyclonal antibody has been demonstrated in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The result of the ELISA for antiserum sensitivity was about 2×10−5 mg/ml and the cross-reactivity determined experimentally showed a high degree of specificity for the antiserum used, because values were all less than 0.1%. Detection of transgenic plants was evaluated using two transgenic rape lines (MS1/RF1 and MS8/RF3) which could be easily distinguished by ELISA.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
China Agricultural University and Cambridge University Press 2006

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