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Limitations and perspectives with the approach to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

  • Cleonice de C. Mota (a1)
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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Cleonice de C. Mota, Chefe do Departamento de Pediatria, Faculdade de Medicina-Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena, 110 – 4° andar, 30130-100 – Belo Horizonte – MG, Brazil. Tel: +55 31 3248 94 37; Fax: +55 31 3248 9770; E-mail: cleomota@medicina.ufmg.br

References

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References

World Health Organization. Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease. Report of a WHO Expert Consultation. WHO technical report series, 923, Geneva, 2004.
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Limitations and perspectives with the approach to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

  • Cleonice de C. Mota (a1)

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