Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The improvement of care for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease across the World: a challenge for the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery

  • Christo I. Tchervenkov (a1), Jeffrey Phillip Jacobs (a2), Pierre-Luc Bernier (a1), Giovanni Stellin (a3), Hiromi Kurosawa (a4), Constantine Mavroudis (a5), Richard A. Jonas (a6), Sertac M. Cicek (a7), Zohair Al-Halees (a8), Martin J. Elliott (a9), Marcelo B. Jatene (a10), Robin H. Kinsley (a11), Christian Kreutzer (a12), Juan Leon-Wyss (a13), Jinfen Liu (a14), Bohdan Maruszewski (a15), Graham R. Nunn (a16), Samuel Ramirez-Marroquin (a17), Nestor Sandoval (a18), Shunji Sano (a19), George E. Sarris (a20), Rajesh Sharma (a21), Ayman Shoeb (a22), Thomas L. Spray (a23), Ross M. Ungerleider (a24), Hervé Yangni-Angate (a25) and Gerhard Ziemer (a26)...

Abstract

The diagnosis and treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease has undergone remarkable progress over the last 60 years. Unfortunately, this progress has been largely limited to the developed world. Yet every year approximately 90% of the more than 1,000,000 children who are born with congenital cardiac disease across the world receive either suboptimal care or are totally denied care.

While in the developed world the focus has changed from an effort to decrease post-operative mortality to now improving quality of life and decreasing morbidity, which is the focus of this Supplement, the rest of the world still needs to develop basic access to congenital cardiac care. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery [http://www.wspchs.org/] was established in 2006. The Vision of the World Society is that every child born anywhere in the world with a congenital heart defect should have access to appropriate medical and surgical care. The Mission of the World Society is to promote the highest quality comprehensive care to all patients with pediatric and/or congenital heart disease, from the fetus to the adult, regardless of the patient’s economic means, with emphasis on excellence in education, research and community service.

We present in this article an overview of the epidemiology of congenital cardiac disease, the current and future challenges to improve care in the developed and developing world, the impact of the globalization of cardiac surgery, and the role that the World Society should play. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery is in a unique position to influence and truly improve the global care of children and adults with congenital cardiac disease throughout the world [http://www.wspchs.org/].

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Christo I. Tchervenkov, MD, Professor of Surgery, McGill University, Director, Cardiovascular Surgery, The Montreal Children’s Hospital, 2300, Tupper Street, Room C-829, Montreal, P.Q., Canada, H3H 1P3. Tel: (514) 412-4400, ext. 22394; Fax: (514) 412-4330; E-mail: christo.tchervenkov@muhc.mcgill.ca

References

Hide All
1.Zupan, J, Aahman, E. Perinatal mortality for the year 2000: estimates developed by WHO. Geneva:World Health Organization, 2005.
2.Lawn, JE, Cousens, S, Zupan, J, et al. 4 million neonatal deaths: When? Where? Why? Lancet 2005; 365: 891900.
3.Kirklin, JW, Barratt-Boyes, BG. Cardiac Surgery, 2nd edition. Churchill-Livingstone, New York, 1993.
4.WHO: Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease. WHO technical report series 2004.
5.American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Infectious Diseases. 2000 Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 25th ed. Pickering LK, (ed.). American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL, 2000.
6.Special Program for Research & Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR)-World Health Organization. Chagas Disease 2002. www.who.int/tdr/diseases/chagas/diseaseinfo.htm.
7.Franklin, RCG, Jacobs, JP, Tchervenkov, CI, Béland, M. Report from the Executive of The International Working Group for Mapping and Coding of Nomenclatures for Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: Bidirectional Crossmap of the Short Lists of the European Paediatric Cardiac Code and the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project. Cardiol Young 2002; 12 (Suppl II): 1822.
8.Franklin, RCG, Jacobs, JP, Tchervenkov, CI, Béland, M. European Paediatric Cardiac Code Short List crossmapped to STS/EACTS Short List with ICD-9 & ICD-10 crossmapping. Cardiol Young 2002; 12 (Suppl II): 2349.
9.Franklin, RCG, Jacobs, JP, Tchervenkov, CI, Béland, M. STS/EACTS Short List mapping to European Paediatric Cardiac Code Short List with ICD-9 & ICD-10 crossmapping. Cardiol Young 2002; 12 (Suppl II): 5062.
10.Béland, M, Jacobs, JP, Tchervenkov, CI, Franklin, RCG. The International Nomenclature Project for Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: Report from the Executive of The International Working Group for Mapping and Coding of Nomenclatures for Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease. Cardiol Young 2002; 12: 425430.
11.Franklin, RCG, Jacobs, JP, Tchervenkov, CI, Béland, M. The International Nomenclature Project for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: Bidirectional Crossmap of the Short Lists of the European Paediatric Cardiac Code and the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project. Cardiol Young 2002; 12: 431435.
12.Béland, MJ, Franklin, RCG, Jacobs, JP, et al. Update from The International Working Group for Mapping and Coding of Nomenclatures for Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease. Cardiol Young 2004; 14: 225229.
13.Tchervenkov, CI, Jacobs, JP, Weinberg, PM, et al. The nomenclature, definition and classification of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Cardiol Young 2006; 16: 339368.
14.Jacobs, JP, Franklin, RCG, Jacobs, ML, et al. Classification of the Functionally Univentricular Heart: Unity from mapped codes. Cardiol Young 2006; 16 (Suppl 1): 921.
15.Jacobs, JP, Franklin, RCG, Wilkinson, JL, et al. The nomenclature, definition and classification of discordant atrioventricular connections. Cardiol Young 2006; 16 (Suppl 3): 7284.
16.Jacobs, JP, Anderson, RH, Weinberg, P, et al. The nomenclature, definition and classification of cardiac structures in the setting of heterotaxy. Cardiol Young 2007; 17 (Suppl 2): 128, doi:10.1017/S1047951107001138.
17.Jacobs, JP, Mavroudis, C, Jacobs, ML, et al. Lessons learned from the data analysis of the second harvest (1998–2001) of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Congenital Heart Surgery Database. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2004; 26: 1837.
18.Jacobs, JP, Maruszewski, B, Tchervenkov, CI, et al. The current status and future directions of efforts to create a global database for the outcomes of therapy for congenital heart disease. Cardiol Young 2005; 15 (Suppl 1): 190198.
19.Jacobs, JP, Jacobs, ML, Maruszewski, B, et al. Current status of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database. Ann Thorac Surg 2005; 80: 22782283; discussion 2283–2284.
20.Jacobs, JP, Wernovsky, G, Elliott, MJ. Analysis of outcomes for congenital cardiac disease: can we do better? Cardiol Young 2007; 17 (Suppl 2): 145158, doi:10.1017/S1047951107001278.
21.Jacobs, JP, Lacour-Gayet, FG, Jacobs, ML, et al. Initial application in the STS congenital database of complexity adjustment to evaluate surgical case mix and results. Ann Thorac Surg 2005; 79: 16351649.
22.Jonas, RA. Rewards, risks, and responsibilities of globalization for the cardiothoracic surgeon. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007; 134: 114.
23.Tchervenkov, CI. Presidential Address: Hearts for life across the World. The World Society News 2007; 1: 68.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed