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Psychosocial needs of children undergoing an invasive procedure for a CHD and their parents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2016


Eveline M. Levert
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Willem A. Helbing
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Karolijn Dulfer
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Ron T. van Domburg
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology-Thoraxcentre, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Elisabeth M. W. J. Utens
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial needs of both parents of children with CHD (aged 0–18 years) and patients themselves (aged 8–18 years) in the week before cardiac surgery or a catheter intervention.

Patients

Eligible participants included all consecutive patients (0–18 years) scheduled to undergo cardiac surgery or a catheter intervention in our hospital between March, 2012 and July, 2013. Psychosocial needs were assessed using a disease-specific questionnaire designed for this study, consisting of a 83-item parent version and a 59-item child version (for children ⩾8 years), each covering five domains: physical/medical, emotional, social, educational/occupational, and health behaviour; two items assessed from whom and in what format psychosocial care was preferred. Quality of life was also assessed.

Interventions

If parents/patients reported a need for psychosocial care, referral to adequate mental health-care professionals was arranged.

Results

More than 40% of participating parents and >50% of participating children reported a need for psychosocial care on each of the five domains. Needs for psychosocial care for parents themselves were highest for those with children aged 0–12 years. Parents and patients report clear preferences when asked from whom and in what format they would like to receive psychosocial care. Quality of life was relatively high for both parents and patients. Psychosocial care interventions in our hospital increased significantly after the implementation of this study.

Conclusions

Results show that psychosocial care is rated as (very) important by both parents and children during an extremely stressful period of their life.


Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2016 

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