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Ten Years of the CIHR Institute of Aging: Building on Strengths, Addressing Gaps, Shaping the Future*

  • Anne Martin-Matthews (a1)

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Corresponding author

Correspondence and requests for offprints should be sent to / La correspondance et les demandes de tirés-à-part doivent être adressées à: Anne Martin-Matthews, Ph.D. CIHR Institute of Aging and Department of Sociology The University of British Columbia 6303 NW Marine Drive Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (amm@exchange.ubc.ca)

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*

The author acknowledges the assistance of Susan Crawford, Ph.D., Assistant Director, CIHR Institute of Aging, in the preparation of this manuscript, which is a revision of a presentation to the Canadian Association on Gerontology, at their Annual Scientific and Educational Meeting, Montréal, Québec, December 3, 2010.

Footnotes

References

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