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Exploring the Influence of Income and Geography on Access to Services for Older Adults in British Columbia: A Multivariate Analysis Using the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 3.1)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Diane E. Allan
Affiliation:
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria
Laura M. Funk
Affiliation:
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria
R. Colin Reid
Affiliation:
Health Studies, University of British Columbia Okanagan
Denise Cloutier-Fisher
Affiliation:
Centre on Aging and Department of Geography, University of Victoria
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Existing research on the health care utilization patterns of older Canadians suggests that income does not usually restrict an individual’s access to care. However, the role that income plays in influencing access to health services by older adults living in rural areas is relatively unknown. This article examines the relationship between income and health service utilization among older adults in rural and urban areas of British Columbia. Data were drawn from Statistics Canada’s Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 3.1. Multivariate regression techniques were employed to examine the influence of relative income on accessibility for 3,424 persons aged 65 and over. Results suggest that (1) relative income does not influence access to health care services; and (2) this is true for both urban and rural older adults. The most important and consistent predictors of access in all cases were those that measured health care need.

Résumé

Les recherches existantes sur les modes d’utilisation des soins de santé des Canadiens âgés suggèrent que habituellement le revenu ne restreint pas l’accès d’une personne. Cependant, le rôle que joue le revenu en influençant l’accès aux services de santé par les personnes âgées vivant en milieux ruraux est relativement inconnu. Cet article examine la relation entre le revenu et l’utilisation des services de santé chez les personnes âgées dans les zones rurales et urbaines de la Colombie-Britannique. Les données ont été extraites de l’Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes (ESCC) de Statistique Canada, cycle 3.1. Avec une régression multivariable, on a examiné l’influence du revenu sur l’accessibilité de 3 424 personnes âgés de 65 ans et plus. Les résultats suggèrent que (1) de faible revenu n’influence pas l’accès aux services de soins de santé, et (2) que cela est vrai pour les adultes âgés urbaines et ruraux. Dans tous les cas, les prédicteurs les plus importants et cohérents d’accès sont ceux qui ont mesuré le besoin de soins de santé.

Type
Regular Articles / Articles réguliers
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 2011

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