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Canadians Think that Nearly All of Us Will Be Allowed Back to Work around August

  • Ryan C. Briggs (a1)

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Business closures and work-from-home orders have been a central part of Canada's plan to slow the spread of COVID-19. The success of these measures hinges on public support, which cannot be taken for granted as the orders induce considerable economic pain. As governments consider when to re-open the economy, one relevant variable is when the public expects the economy to re-open. At minimum, if public perceptions differ from government plans then additional government messaging is required to better align expectations.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author. Email: rbriggs@uoguelph.ca

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Canadians Think that Nearly All of Us Will Be Allowed Back to Work around August

  • Ryan C. Briggs (a1)

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