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Confirmation Based on Analogical Inference: Bayes Meets Jeffrey

  • Christian J. Feldbacher-Escamilla (a1) and Alexander Gebharter (a2)

Abstract

Certain hypotheses cannot be directly confirmed for theoretical, practical, or moral reasons. For some of these hypotheses, however, there might be a workaround: confirmation based on analogical reasoning. In this paper we take up Dardashti, Hartmann, Thébault, and Winsberg’s (2019) idea of analyzing confirmation based on analogical inference Bayesian style. We identify three types of confirmation by analogy and show that Dardashti et al.’s approach can cover two of them. We then highlight possible problems with their model as a general approach to analogical inference and argue that these problems can be avoided by supplementing Bayesian update with Jeffrey conditionalization.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author. Email: cj.feldbacher.escamilla@gmail.com

References

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Keywords

Confirmation Based on Analogical Inference: Bayes Meets Jeffrey

  • Christian J. Feldbacher-Escamilla (a1) and Alexander Gebharter (a2)

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