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Epistemicism and modality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2020

Juhani Yli-Vakkuri
Affiliation:
CSMN, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Corresponding

Abstract

What kind of semantics should someone who accepts the epistemicist theory of vagueness defended in Timothy Williamson's Vagueness (1994) give a definiteness operator? To impose some interesting constraints on acceptable answers to this question, I will assume that the object language also contains a metaphysical necessity operator and a metaphysical actuality operator. I will suggest that the answer is to be found by working within a three-dimensional model theory. I will provide sketches of two ways of extracting an epistemicist semantics from that model theory, one of which I will find to be more plausible than the other.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Journal of Philosophy 2016

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References

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