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Effectiveness of a Multidisciplinary Treatment Program for Chronic Daily Headache

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2014

Jane E. Magnusson
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary and the Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Connie M. Riess
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary and the Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Werner J. Becker
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary and the Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Abstract

Background:

Chronic daily headache (CDH: headache on fifteen days a month or more) is one of the most common forms of chronic pain. The relative efficacy of different treatment methods for these patients needs to be determined.

Objective:

To compare treatment outcomes for patients with CDH treated in a traditional office-based pharmacological treatment program with a second group treated in a multidisciplinary management program.

Methods:

Patient outcomes were measured using changes in the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and the Short-Form-36 (SF-36) over the treatment period. Outcomes from seventy patients treated in an office setting were compared to thirty-seven patients treated in a multidisciplinary headache treatment program. Both groups received similar pharmacological treatment. All patients treated in the office setting and the majority of patients in the multidisciplinary program had transformed migraine.

Results:

Even though a reduction in headache days per month occurred, mean headache related disability (measured by HDI) and mean Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL measured by SF-36) did not improve for the patient group treated in the office setting but did improve significantly for the patient group treated in the multidisciplinary headache program.

Conclusion:

For patients with CDH, headache-related disability and HRQoL is more likely to improve with management in a multidisciplinary headache treatment program as compared to the traditional specialist consultation - family physician office-based setting.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2004

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