Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-kl86h Total loading time: 0.288 Render date: 2021-04-12T23:24:00.424Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in contact sports: The Canadian experience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 May 2018

L.N. Hazrati
Affiliation:
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is suggested to be a progressive neurodegenerative disease, characterized by tau deposits in the depth of cortical sulci in neurons and in glioneuronal complexes around blood vessels. Few studies have suggested that it is caused by multiple concussions or subconcussive brain injuries. A recent publication showed that most American football players whose brain were donated to the Boston University concussion center had CTE (Mez et al. 2017). Over the last 6 years, with the help of neuropathologist colleagues across Canada, we have collected the brains of 33 high level professional and amateur athletes. These include 5 National hockey league (NHL) players, 15 Canadian football league (CFL) players, 3 College football players, 3 College hockey players, 2 professional boxers, 1 professional bull rider, 1 BMX champion, 1 rugby player and 2 skiers. All were male and the ages ranging from 15 to 87 years. Our results indicate that only a small portion of cases have CTE. Moreover, most cases are low stage (stage 1 or 2) and this pathology is mainly seen in some of the younger players. Older players either have no pathological findings or have other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. The disparity of results between the 2 groups will be discussed.

Type
Abstracts
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences Inc. 2018 

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 192 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 25th May 2018 - 12th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in contact sports: The Canadian experience
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in contact sports: The Canadian experience
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in contact sports: The Canadian experience
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *