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Cerebral Abscesses Resulting from H1N1 Influenza with Staphylococcal Co-Infection

  • Derek J. Roberts (a1), John J.P. Kelly (a2), Rajiv Midha (a2) and Aleksa Cenic (a2)
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Copyright

Corresponding author

Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 2T9, Canada

References

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5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Bacterial co-infections in lung tissue specimens from fatal cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1)---United States, May-August. 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009;58:1071-4.
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14. Jang, H, Boltz, D, Sturm-Ramirez, K, et al. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus can enter the central nervous system and induce neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2009;106(33):140638.
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Cerebral Abscesses Resulting from H1N1 Influenza with Staphylococcal Co-Infection

  • Derek J. Roberts (a1), John J.P. Kelly (a2), Rajiv Midha (a2) and Aleksa Cenic (a2)

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