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The Behavioural Neurology Assessment

  • S. Darvesh (a1), L. Leach (a2), S. E. Black (a3), E. Kaplan (a4) and M. Freedman (a5)...

Abstract:

Background:

We present information regarding the standardization, reliability and clinical validity of two versions of the Behavioural Neurology Assessment (BNA). The BNA-Long Form consists of 24 subtests within separate domains: Attention, Memory, Language, Visuospatial Function, Executive Function, and Praxis. The BNA-Short Form consists of 13 subtests within the domains of Attention, Memory, Naming, Visuospatial Function and Executive Function. In addition to individual domain indices, a Grand Total score was calculated for both BNA versions.

Objective:

To standardize the administration and scoring and validate the BNA for detection of dementia.

Methods:

Standardized normative data were obtained on 115 healthy subjects ranging in age from 50 to 95. Test-retest stability was obtained on 19 subjects and clinical validity was investigated by administering the BNA and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) to 29 patients with dementia and 29 age-matched healthy subjects (controls).

Results:

Age had a significant effect on all but the Visuospatial and Praxis indices of the BNA-Long Form and an effect on Naming and Grand Total score of the Short-Form. Internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient a) was .87 and .67 for the Long and Short Forms (.95 and .96 for dementia and control groups combined). Test-retest stability was acceptable. Grand Total indices of both BNA versions showed significant, positive correlations with the MMSE. Both BNA versions had superior sensitivity to dementia relative to the MMSE (.93 versus .79). Specificity was equivalent to the MMSE (.93 versus .97).

Conclusions:

Positive predictive values of the BNA and MMSE are equivalent but the BNA provides superior negative predictive value.

RÉSUMÉ: Introduction:

Nous discutons de la standardisation, de la fiabilité et de la validité Clinique de deux versions différentes de l’évaluation neurologique comportementale (ÉNC). La version longue de l’ÉNC est constituée de 24 sous-tests dans différentes sphères: l’attention, la mémoire, le langage, la fonction visuospatiale, la fonction exécutive et la praxie. La version courte est constituée de 13 sous-tests dans les sphères de l’attention, de la mémoire, de la dénomination, de la fonction visuospatiale et de la fonction exécutive. En plus des indices pour chaque sphère, un score global a été calculé pour les deux versions de l’ÉNC.

Objectif:

Standardiser l’administration et l’évaluation de l’ÉNC et valider ce test pour la détection de la démence.

Méthodes:

Des données normatives standardisées ont été obtenues chez 115 sujets sains don’t l’âge variait de 50 à 95 ans. La stabilité test-retest a été évaluée chez 19 sujets et la validité clinique chez 29 sujets déments et 29 témoins sains, appariés pour l’âge, à qui on a administré l’ÉNC et le MMSE.

Résultats:

En ce qui concerne la version longue de l’ÉNC, l’âge avait une influence significative sur tout sauf sur les indices visuospatiaux et la praxie et dans la version courte, il avait une influence significative sur le langage et sur le score global. La cohérence interne (coefficient de Cronbach a) était de 0,87 et 0,67 pour la version longue et la version courte respectivement (0,95 et 0,96 pour les groupes déments et témoins combinés). La stabilité test-retest était acceptable. Le score global pour les deux versions de l’ÉNC avait une correlation positive significative avec le MMSE. Les deux versions de l’ÉNC avaient une sensibilité supérieure pour la démence relativement au MMSE (0,93 versus 0,79). La spécificité était équivalente à celle du MMSE (0,93 versus 0,97).

Conclusions:

Les valeurs prédictives positives de l’ÉNC et du MMSE sont équivalentes. Cependant, l’ÉNC a une valeur prédictive négative supérieure.

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The Behavioural Neurology Assessment

  • S. Darvesh (a1), L. Leach (a2), S. E. Black (a3), E. Kaplan (a4) and M. Freedman (a5)...

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