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Academic Career Paths in Linguistics: A Report on the CLA Questionnaire

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 June 2016

Patricia Balcom
Affiliation:
Université de Moncton
Sandra Clarke
Affiliation:
Memorial University of Newfoundland

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a survey conducted by the CLA in 1996-1997. Mail-in questionnaires were completed by 110 Canadian linguists from all regions of the country, 71 of whom (65%) were female, and 39 (35%) male. Following an overview of the literature dealing with women in academia in general and linguistics in particular, a summary of the background and status of the respondents is given. The results are presented thematically, exploring (i) the division between teaching, research and committee work; (ii) mentoring; (iii) financial support; (iv) the relative prestige of sub-disciplines. Of note is the fact that SPSS analyses show very few significant differences when sex was taken as a variable. The quantitative results provide a snapshot of linguistics in Canada in the late 1990s, and coupled with the numerous comments provided by respondents, point to issues that need to be addressed by the Canadian Linguistics Association. These are summarized in the Conclusion as a series of recommendations to the Association.

Résumé

Résumé

Cet article présente les résultats d’un sondage effectué par l’ACL entre 1996 et 1997. 110 linguistes représentant toutes les régions du Canada ont complété un questionnaire postal, dont 71 (65%) femmes et 39 (35%) hommes. Après un recensement des écrits au sujet des femmes universitaires en général et les femmes en linguistique en particulier, un résumé des données démographiques des répondantes et des répondants est donné. Ensuite les résultats du questionnaire sont présentés thématiquement : (i) la répartition entre l’enseignement, la recherche et la service à la collectivité; (ii) le réseau d’appuis; (iii) le support financier; (iv) le prestige relatif des sous-disciplines. À noter est le fait que les analyses SPSS ont trouvé très peu de différences significatives en considérant le sexe comme variable. Ces résultats quantitatifs offrent un instantané de la linguistique au Canada à la fin des années 1990, et combinés avec les nombreux commentaires des répondants, donnent une indication des préoccupations auxquelles devrait s’adresser l’Association canadienne de linguistique. La Conclusion donne un résumé de ces questions en forme d’une série de recommandations à l’Association.

Type
Special Report/Rapport Spécial
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Linguistic Association 2004

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