Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Shocked, breathless, and bloodied: Point-of-care ultrasound on the front line

  • Paul R. Atkinson (a1) and D. Lewis (a1)
  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Shocked, breathless, and bloodied: Point-of-care ultrasound on the front line
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Shocked, breathless, and bloodied: Point-of-care ultrasound on the front line
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Shocked, breathless, and bloodied: Point-of-care ultrasound on the front line
      Available formats
      ×

Abstract

  • An abstract is not available for this content so a preview has been provided below. To view the full text please use the links above to select your preferred format.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Dr. Paul Atkinson, Department of Emergency Medicine, 400 University Ave., Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, NB E2L 4L4; Email: paul.atkinson@dal.ca

References

Hide All
1.Moore, CL, Copel, JA. Point-of-care ultrasonography. N Engl J Med 2011;364(8):749–57.
2.Jones, A, Tayal, V, Sullivan, D, et al. Randomized, controlled trial of immediate versus delayed goal-directed ultrasound to identify the cause of nontraumatic hypotension in emergency department patients. Crit Care Med 2004;32:1703–8.
3.Atkinson, PR, McAuley, DJ, Kendall, RJ, et al. Abdominal and cardiac evaluation with sonography in shock (ACES): an approach by emergency physicians for the use of ultrasound in patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Emerg Med J 2009;26:8791.
4.Perera, P, Mailhot, T, Riley, D, et al. The RUSH exam: rapid ultrasound in shock in the evaluation of the critically ill. Emerg Med Clin North Am 2010;28:2956.
5.Stickles, SP, Carpenter, CR, Gekle, R, et al. The diagnostic accuracy of a point-of-care ultrasound protocol for shock etiology: a systematic review and meta-analysis. CJEM 2019;21:406–17.
6.Atkinson, P, Bowra, J, Milne, J, et al. International Federation for Emergency Medicine Consensus Statement: sonography in hypotension and cardiac arrest (SHoC): an international consensus on the use of point of care ultrasound for undifferentiated hypotension and during cardiac arrest. CJEM 2017;19(6):459–70.
7.Atkinson, PR, Milne, J, Diegelmann, L, et al. Does point-of-care ultrasonography improve clinical outcomes in emergency department patients with undifferentiated hypotension? An international randomized controlled trial from the SHoC-ED investigators. Ann Emerg Med 2018;72(4):478–89.
8.Pivetta, E, Goffi, A, Nazerian, P, et al. Lung ultrasound integrated with clinical assessment for the diagnosis of acute decompensated heart failure in the emergency department: a randomized controlled trial. Eur J Heart Fail 2019: doi: 10.1002/ejhf.1379. [Epub ahead of print]
9.Sartini, S, Frizzi, J, Borselli, M, et al. Which method is best for an early accurate diagnosis of acute heart failure? Comparison between lung ultrasound, chest X-ray and NT pro-BNP performance: a prospective study. Intern Emerg Med 2017;12(6):861–9.
10.McGivery, K, Atkinson, P, Lewis, D, et al. Emergency department ultrasound for the detection of B-lines in the early diagnosis of acute decompensated heart failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis. CJEM 2018;20(3):343–52.
11.Markarian, T, Zieleskiewicz, L, Perrin, G, et al. A lung ultrasound score for early triage of elderly patients with acute dyspnea. CJEM 2019;21(3):399405.
12.Sanz, GE, Theoret, J, Liao, MM, et al. Bacterial contamination and cleanliness of emergency department ultrasound probes. CJEM 2011;13(6):384–9.
13.Poonja, Z, Uppal, J, Netherton, SJ, et al. Evaluation of emergency department ultrasound machines for the presence of occult blood. CJEM 2018;21(3):395–98.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Shocked, breathless, and bloodied: Point-of-care ultrasound on the front line

  • Paul R. Atkinson (a1) and D. Lewis (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.