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Resuscitation interventions in a tertiary level pediatric emergency department: implications for maintenance of skills

  • F. Jonathan Guilfoyle (a1), Ruth Milner (a2) and Niranjan Kissoon (a3)

Abstract

Objective:

To describe the frequency and proportion of successful resuscitation interventions in a pediatric emergency department (PED).

Methods and Material:

This was a retrospective chart review of children at the BC Children's Hospital (BCCH) PED who were admitted to the BCCH pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in 2004 and 2005. Demographic data, diagnosis, and resuscitation interventions in the PED and within the first 24 hours of PICU admission were recorded. The training of the operator and the number of attempts needed were also recorded.

Results:

There were 75,133 PED visits; 304 of 329 (92.4%) who met inclusion criteria were reviewed. Diagnoses included respiratory distress (n = 115, 35%), trauma (n = 50, 15%), sepsis (n = 36, 11%), seizures (n = 37, 11%), and cardiac disease (n = 22, 7%). Ninety-nine patients required intubation. Intubations in the PED were performed by residents (20%), pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows (15%), PEM attending staff (29%), and PICU fellows (12%); 81% of these were successful on the first attempt. In the PED, seven central lines were placed, seven intraosseous needles were inserted, 15 patients required inotropes, and 9 patients required chest compressions.

Conclusion:

Critical illness in our emergency department is a rare event; hence, opportunities to resuscitate, secure airways, and place central venous catheters are limited. Additional training, close working relationships between the PED and the PICU teams, and resuscitation protocols for early PICU involvement may be needed.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

BC Children's Hospital, 4480 Oak Street, Room B245, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4; nkissoon@cw.bc.ca

References

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Resuscitation interventions in a tertiary level pediatric emergency department: implications for maintenance of skills

  • F. Jonathan Guilfoyle (a1), Ruth Milner (a2) and Niranjan Kissoon (a3)

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