Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

P125: Faculty development in the age of competency-based medical education: a national, cross-sectional needs assessment for Canadian emergency medicine faculty

  • A. Stefan (a1), J. Hall (a1), J. Sherbino (a1) and T. Chan (a1)

Abstract

Introduction: In July 2018, Emergency Medicine (EM) transitioned to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada's (RCPSC) Competence by Design (CBD) training framework. In anticipation of CBD implementation, we conducted a nation-wide needs assessment of EM faculty and senior residents to understand their attitudes towards CBD, workplace-based assessments (WBA) and overall educational needs. Methods: A multi-site, cross-sectional digital survey was conducted in winter 2018 with a sample of EM faculty and senior residents across RCPSC EM programs in Canada. Recruitment was via program director nomination. Survey domains included baseline perceptions about CBD, attitudes toward implementation, perceived/prompted and unperceived faculty development needs. Microsoft Excel was used to calculate descriptive statistics. This study was reviewed by the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board.A multi-site, cross-sectional digital survey was conducted in winter 2018 with a sample of EM faculty and senior residents across RCPSC EM programs in Canada. Recruitment was via program director nomination. Survey domains included baseline perceptions about CBD, attitudes toward implementation, perceived/prompted and unperceived faculty development needs. Microsoft Excel was used to calculate descriptive statistics. This study was reviewed by the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board. Results: Between February-April 2018, 47 participants (40 faculty, 7 residents) completed the survey (58.8% response rate). Most respondents (89.4%) thought learner feedback should be provided on each shift; 55.3% believed they provided adequate feedback. Time constraints, learner disinterest and fear of assessment repercussions were the top three barriers to providing good feedback. A majority of respondents (78.7%) thought that the ED provided above average opportunities for direct observation and 91.5% were confident of incorporating WBAs into their practice. 44.7% reported that CBD will not impact patient care; 17.0% perceived it may have a negative impact. 55.3% felt that CBD will lead to improved feedback for trainees. The top areas for faculty development were: feedback delivery, completing WBAs, resident promotion decisions, and receiving feedback on teaching. Only 25.5% were interested in learning about CBD, although the average of correct responses on the CBD knowledge test was 44.6%. Conclusion: EM is well-situated to transition to CBD given clinicians’ positive attitudes towards feedback, direct observation, WBAs, and opportunities for direct observation. Threats to CBD implementation are concerns about effects on patient care and trainee education, and skepticism regarding effects on feedback quality. Faculty development should concentrate on further developing clinical teaching and supervision skills, focusing on feedback and WBAs.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      P125: Faculty development in the age of competency-based medical education: a national, cross-sectional needs assessment for Canadian emergency medicine faculty
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      P125: Faculty development in the age of competency-based medical education: a national, cross-sectional needs assessment for Canadian emergency medicine faculty
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      P125: Faculty development in the age of competency-based medical education: a national, cross-sectional needs assessment for Canadian emergency medicine faculty
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed