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P109: Does an elevated troponin ultimately matter? An assessment of outcomes in patients presenting to the emergency department with non-cardiac complaints

  • K. Endres (a1), B. Chow (a1) and H. Garuba (a1)

Abstract

Introduction: Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the most time-sensitive diagnoses made in the emergency department (ED). Troponin (TNI) measurement is an invaluable tool; however, its utility depends on the clinical context and is highest where there is a strong pre-test probability. Studies show that most TNI elevations are due to non-cardiovascular causes; however, elevated TNI has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, often prompting additional investigations. The aim of our study was to compare 1-year cardiac outcomes of patients who presented to the ED with non-cardiac complaints and elevated TNI who had further cardiac testing versus those who did not. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients ≥18 seen in the ED for non-cardiac complaints with a high TNI from January-June 2016. Patients were stratified into two groups: 1) those who received diagnostic testing for ischemia and/or a cardiac consultation and 2) those without cardiac consultation or testing. Data was also collected on major adverse cardiac events within 1-year of ED presentation. Chi-squared analysis assessed the difference in proportions of outcomes between groups. We present our preliminary data. Results: In total, 1500 patients met inclusion criteria and 861 have been analyzed thus far. Of these 861, 209 went on to have either diagnostic testing for ischemia and/or a cardiology consult while 652 had no further investigations. There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients who developed unstable angina (p = 0.9824), ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (p = 0.9956), non-STEMI (p = 0.9008), stroke/TIA (p = 0.9657), revascularization (p = 0.8873), cardiac hospitalization (p = 0.9446) or died (p = 0.8972), within 1-year of their ED presentation. Conclusion: In patients with isolated elevated TNI and non-cardiac complaints, preliminary data showed no difference in mortality or cardiac event rates between those who had further testing/consultations and those who did not. TNI ordering could be cautiously limited to only presenting complaints/preliminary diagnoses likely to have cardiac etiology or sequelae or those in whom further testing would impact management/outcomes. Quality of care may be improved by reducing length of stay in the ED and potential risks of unnecessary tests. Future studies include determining cost implications and classifying what level of TNI elevation in non-ACS patients may predict a future cardiac outcome.

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P109: Does an elevated troponin ultimately matter? An assessment of outcomes in patients presenting to the emergency department with non-cardiac complaints

  • K. Endres (a1), B. Chow (a1) and H. Garuba (a1)

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