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P099: Perceptions of assessment and feedback: hawks, doves and impact on learning

  • K. Pardhan (a1) and L. Jones (a1)

Abstract

Introduction: Residency training takes place in a work-place learning environment. Residents may work with several supervisors over the course of their training and each will provide feedback and assessments to them. Each supervisor may have a different approach to the delivery of their feedback and may deliver different assessments for the same quality of performance. Research question: among residents who receive regular feedback how do different styles of feedback by supervisors impact the residents’ learning? Methods: A qualitative methodology was used. Participants were residents from residency programs that have routine one-on-one feedback and assessment. In depth, semi-structured one-on-one interviews were conducted by the primary investigator (PI). These were then transcribed, reviewed and coded. The participants were University of Toronto and McMaster University residents. Sample size will be determined by thematic saturation and data collection is ongoing. The interview guide was updated in an iterative fashion to further explore themes generated in the initial interviews. Interview transcripts will be reviewed and coded by the PI with assistance from collaborators with qualitative methodological expertise. Results: Analysis of the first six participants revealed five themes. Residents described remembering feedback that generated a strong emotional response, both positive and negative; reflection on feedback as a component of using it for learning was consistent; issues with reconciling feedback received that was in conflict with previously feedback; relationship with the individual providing the feedback impacted feedback interpretation; feedback was parsed by residents to determine the rationale of the assessor and whether to incorporate feedback into learning process. Conclusion: How residents use feedback to further their learning is variable. This study identifies that styles of feedback, emotional response and relationship with the provider are all contributors to the learning that occurs after a feedback encounter. It also identifies that residents reflect on feedback differently and make decisions about how to incorporate feedback into their learning and practice. The individuality of these responses to feedback are important for trainee self-reflection in furthering their learning as well as important in faculty development as they develop skills in assessment and feedback. It is also important for training programs that facilitate the trainee supervisor interactions.

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