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P014: An investigation to determine if being roomed next to a psychiatric patient affects patient satisfaction and perception of care in those not being evaluated for a psychiatric complaint

  • F.A. Blais (a1)

Abstract

Introduction: Nearly 12 million emergency department (ED) visits in the USA annually are related to a mental health and/or substance abuse condition. This is equivalent to 1 out of every 8 ED visits or 12.5 percent of all ED visits annually. States cut $5 billion in mental health services from 2009 to 2012. In the same period, the country eliminated at least 4,500 public psychiatric hospital beds. This has led to an increase in psychiatric boarding. Boarding consumes scarce ED resources and prolongs the amount of time that all patients must spend waiting for services. The aim of this study is to determine if being roomed next to a psychiatric patient affects patient satisfaction and perception of care. Methods: A survey consisting of 15 patient satisfaction questions was distributed to patients over a period of three months in the ED at a tertiary care center with >125,000 visits a year. Patients included were English-speaking adults (18 years or older) with an Emergency Severity Index of 3-5. Responses were analyzed with a chi-square across 2 groups with p-value of 0.05 considered as significant. Results: A convenience sample of 78 surveys was obtained. 40 surveys were completed by those roomed next to a patient with a psychiatric complaint and 38 surveys were completed by patients not roomed next to a patient being seen for a psychiatric complaint. For every satisfaction question asked, the patients placed away from mental health encounters gave significantly higher ratings than the patients roomed near psychiatric patients. Patients roomed next to psychiatric patients had a statistically significant decrease in satisfaction in nursing attentiveness, nursing promptness in responding to the call bell, attentiveness of the physician team, and of the overall encounter itself. All values were significant with all but one p-value being <0.01.There was no difference between the 2 groups with respect to gender, age range, reason for visit or wait time. Conclusion: This study suggests that patients being roomed next to a patient with a psychiatric complaint had significantly decreased patient satisfaction.

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