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MP27: Designing team success - an engineering solution to avoid chest tube equipment chaos using best available evidence, consensus and prototyping

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 May 2019

R. Hanlon
Affiliation:
Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Saint John, NB
J. French
Affiliation:
Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Saint John, NB
P. Atkinson
Affiliation:
Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Saint John, NB
J. Fraser
Affiliation:
Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Saint John, NB
S. Benjamin
Affiliation:
Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Saint John, NB
J. Poon
Affiliation:
Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Saint John, NB

Abstract

Background: Chest tube insertion is a time and safety critical procedure with a significant complication rate (up to 30%). Industry routinely uses Lean and ergonomic methodology to improve systems. This process improvement study used best evidence review, small group consensus, process mapping and prototyping in order to design a lean and ergonomically mindful equipment solution. Aim Statement: By simplifying and reorganising chest tube equipment, we aim to provide users with adequate equipment, reduce equipment waste, and wasted effort locating equipment. Measures & Design: The study was conducted between March 2018 and November 2018. An initial list of process steps from the best available evidence was produced. This list was then augmented by multispecialty team consensus (3 Emergency Physicians, 1 Thoracic Surgeon, 1 medical student, 2 EM nurses). Necessary equipment was identified. Next, two prototyping phases were conducted using a task trainer and a realistic interprofessional team (1 EM Physician, 1 ER Nurse, 1 Medical student) to refine the equipment list and packaging. A final equipment storage system was produced and evaluated by an interprofessional team during cadaver training using a survey and Likert scales. Evaluation/Results: There were 47 equipment items in the pre-intervention ED chest tube tray. After prototyping 21 items were removed while nine critical items were added. The nine items missing from the original design were found in four different locations in the department. Six physicians and seven RNs participated in cadaver testing and completed an evaluation survey of the new layout. Participants preferred the new storage design (Likert median 5, IQR of 1) over the current storage design (median of 1, IQR of 1). Discussion/Impact: The results suggest that the lean equipment storage is preferred by ED staff compared to the current set-up, may reduce time finding missing equipment, and will reduce waste. Future simulation work will quantitatively understand compliance with safety critical steps, user stress, wasted user time and cost.

Type
Moderated Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2019 

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