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LO43: Perceptions of airway checklists and the utility of simulation in their implementation emergency medicine practitioner perspectives

  • C. Forristal (a1), K. Hayman (a1), N. Smith (a1), S. Mal (a1), M. Columbus (a1), N. Farooki (a1), S. McLeod (a1), K. Van Aarsen (a1) and D. Ouellette (a1)...

Abstract

Introduction: Checklists used during intubation have been associated with improved patient safety. Since simulation provides an effective and safe learning environment, it is an ideal modality for training practitioners to effectively employ an airway checklist. However, physician attitudes surrounding the utility of both checklists and simulation may impede the implementation process of airway checklists into clinical practice. This study sought to characterize attitudinal factors that may impact the implementation of airway checklists, including perceptions of checklist utility and simulation training. Methods: Emergency medicine (EM) residents and physicians working more than 20 hours/month in an emergency department from two academic centres were invited to participate in a simulated, randomized controlled trial (RCT) featuring three scenarios performed with or without the use of an airway checklist. Following participation in the scenarios, participants completed either a 26-item (control group), or 35-item (checklist group) paper-based survey comprised of multiple-choice, Likert-type, rank-list and open-ended questions exploring their perceptions of the airway checklist (checklist group only) and simulation as a learning modality (all participants). Results: Fifty-four EM practitioners completed the questionnaire. Most control group participants (n=24/25, 96.0%) believed an airway checklist would have been helpful (scored 5/7 or greater) for the scenarios. The majority of checklist group participants (n=29) believed that the checklist was helpful for equipment (27, 93.1%) and patient (26, 89.6%) preparation, and post-intubation care (21, 82.8%), but that the checklist delayed definitive airway management and was not helpful for airway assessment, medication selection, or choosing to perform a surgical airway. This group also believed that using the airway checklist would reduce errors during intubation (27, 93.1%) and that the simulated scenarios were beneficial for adopting the use of the checklist (28, 96.6%). Fifty-three participants (98.1%) believed that simulation is beneficial for continuing medical education and 51 respondents (94.4%) thought that skills learned in this simulation were transferable. Conclusion: EM practitioners participating in a simulation-based RCT of an airway checklist had positive attitudes towards both the utility of airway checklists and simulation as a learning modality. Thus, simulation may be an effective process to train practitioners to use airway checklists prior to clinical implementation.

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LO43: Perceptions of airway checklists and the utility of simulation in their implementation emergency medicine practitioner perspectives

  • C. Forristal (a1), K. Hayman (a1), N. Smith (a1), S. Mal (a1), M. Columbus (a1), N. Farooki (a1), S. McLeod (a1), K. Van Aarsen (a1) and D. Ouellette (a1)...

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