Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

LO29: Unexplained variation in ‘to-go’ opioid prescribing across emergency departments in a large Canadian cohort

  • J. Hayward (a1) and G. Innes (a1)

Abstract

Introduction: Emergency Department (ED) opioid prescribing has been linked to long-term use and dependence. Small packets of opioid medications are sometimes prescribed at discharge, i.e. ‘To-Go’, in an attempt to treat pain but avoid unintended consequences. The extent of this practice and its associated risks are not fully understood. This study's objective was to describe the use of ‘To-Go’ opioids in a large urban center. Methods: Multicenter linked administrative databases were used to recruit an observational cohort. The referral population was comprised of all patients discharged from a Calgary ED in 2016 (four hospitals) with an arrival pain score greater than 0. We first described this population and then performed a multivariable analysis to assess for predictors of ‘To-Go’ opioids. ‘To-Go’ opioids were either Tylenol-Codeine or Tylenol-Oxycodone. Results: A total of 88,855 patients were recruited. The majority were female (57%) and the average age was 44.5 yrs. Abdominal pain was the most frequent complaint (22.1%) followed by extremity (18.3%) and cardiac pain (8.0%). Overall, 2,736 patients (3.1%) received an opioid ‘To-Go’ with significant variation in prescribing rates across hospitals (1.8-5% Chi2 p < 0.05). Logistic regression (covariates: age, sex, CTAS, pain score, type of pain, hospital, ED opioid, length of stay) revealed that receiving an opioid (IV or PO) prior to discharge was the strongest predictor of ‘To-Go’ opioid (OR 6.4 [5.9-7.0]). Hospital (OR 1.4 [1.3-1.4]) and male sex (OR 1.2 [1.1-1.3]) also emerged as predictors, whereas age over 65 decreased the odds of ‘To-Go’ opioid (OR 0.8 [0.6-0.9]). Hospital-specific ORs ranged from 1.3-2.7. Conclusion: In comparable patient populations some hospitals are more likely than others to provide a short course of opioids at discharge. This difference is not explained by patient demographics, pain profiles, or medications prior to discharge. The reasons for this variation are unclear but it underscores the need to determine the risks of ED opioid exposures and develop clear evidence-based prescribing guidelines.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      LO29: Unexplained variation in ‘to-go’ opioid prescribing across emergency departments in a large Canadian cohort
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      LO29: Unexplained variation in ‘to-go’ opioid prescribing across emergency departments in a large Canadian cohort
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      LO29: Unexplained variation in ‘to-go’ opioid prescribing across emergency departments in a large Canadian cohort
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Keywords

LO29: Unexplained variation in ‘to-go’ opioid prescribing across emergency departments in a large Canadian cohort

  • J. Hayward (a1) and G. Innes (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed