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A five-step program for diagnostic test addiction

  • Samuel G. Campbell (a1), Grant D. Innes (a2), Kirk D. Magee (a1), Manal O. Elnenaei (a3) and Brian H. Rowe (a4)...
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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Samuel G. Campbell, Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2, Email: Samuel.campbell@nshealth.ca

References

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1.Kanzaria, HK, Hoffman, JR, Probst, MA, et al. Emergency physician perceptions of medically unnecessary advanced diagnostic imaging. Acad Emerg Med 2015;22:390–8.
2.Wagholikar, A, O'Dwyer, J, Hansen, D, Chu, K. Observing effectiveness of pathology ordering controls in emergency departments. Stud Health Technol Inform 2011;168:172–8.
3.Chu, KH, Wagholikar, AS, Greenslade, JH, et al. Sustained reductions in emergency department laboratory test orders: impact of a simple intervention. Postgrad Med J 2013;89:566–71.
4.van Walraven, C, Naylor, CD. Do we know what inappropriate laboratory utilization is? A systematic review of laboratory clinical audits. JAMA 1998;280:550–8.
5.Worster, A, Innes, G, Abu-Laban, RB. Diagnostic testing: an emergency medicine perspective. CJEM 2002;4(5):348–54.
6.Rang, M. The Ulysses syndrome. CMAJ 1972;106:122–3.
7.McDonald, IG, Daly, J, Jelinek, VM, et al. Opening Pandora's box: the unpredictability of reassurance by a normal test result. BMJ 1996;313:329–32.
8.Rolfe, A, Burton, C. Reassurance after diagnostic testing with a low pretest probability of serious disease: systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Intern Med 2013;173(6):407–16.
9.Kroenke, K. Diagnostic testing and the illusory reassurance of normal results: comment on “Reassurance after diagnostic testing with a low pretest probability of serious disease.” JAMA Intern Med 2013;173(6):416–7.
10.van Ravesteijn, H, van Dijk, I, Darmon, D, et al. The reassuring value of diagnostic tests: a systematic review. Patient Educ Couns 2012;86:38.
11.Siontis, KC, Siontis, GC, Contopoulos-Ioannidis, DG, Ioannidis, JP. Diagnostic tests often fail to lead to changes in patient outcomes. J Clin Epidemiol 2014;67:612–21.
12.van de Wijngaart, DJ, Scherrenburg, J, van den Broek, L, et al. A survey of doctors reveals that few laboratory tests are of primary importance at the emergency department. Diagnosis 2014;1:239–44.
13.Tainter, CR, Gentges, JA, Thomas, SH, Burns, BD. Can emergency medicine residents predict cost of diagnostic testing? West J Emerg Med 2017;18:159–62.
14.McGee, S. Simplifying likelihood ratios. J Gen Intern Med 2002;17:647–50.
15.Doclogica. Medical diagnosis for the 21st century. 2019. Available at: http://www.doclogica.com/ (accessed January 29, 2019).
16.Pines, JM. Profiles in patient safety: confirmation bias in emergency medicine. Acad Emerg Med 2006;13:90–4.
17.Kendrick, D, Fielding, K, Bentley, E, et al. The role of radiography in primary care patients with low back pain of at least 6 weeks duration: a randomised (unblinded) controlled trial. Health Technol Assess 2001;5:169.

Keywords

A five-step program for diagnostic test addiction

  • Samuel G. Campbell (a1), Grant D. Innes (a2), Kirk D. Magee (a1), Manal O. Elnenaei (a3) and Brian H. Rowe (a4)...

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