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Emergency department procedural sedation and analgesia: A Canadian Community Effectiveness and Safety Study (ACCESS)

  • Mark Mensour (a1), Robert Pineau (a2), Vic Sahai (a3) and Jennifer Michaud (a4)

Abstract

Objectives:

To determine the effectiveness and safety of procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) in a Canadian community emergency department (ED) staffed primarily by family physicians and to assess the role of capnometry monitoring in PSA.

Methods:

One hundred and sixty (160) consecutive procedural sedation cases were reviewed from the ED of a rural hospital in Huntsville, Ont. The ED is mainly staffed by family physicians who have received in-house training in PSA. Safety and effectiveness measures were extrapolated from a standardized PSA form by a blinded research assistant.

Results:

The mean age of the patient population was 33.6 years (standard deviation = 23.6). Fifty-four percent of the patients were male, and 33% of the cases were pediatric. PSA medications included propofol (84%), fentanyl (51%) and midazolam (15%), and the procedural success rate was 95.6%. The adverse event (AE) rate was 18% and included apnea (10%), inadequate sedation (3%), bradycardia (2%), desaturation (1%), hypotension (1%) and bag-valve-mask use (1%). In those aged ≥65 years there was a greater incidence of apnea. There were no episodes of emesis and there were no intubations. A modified jaw thrust manoeuvre was used in 23% of the cases. In the 64% of cases where capnometry was used, there was no association between its use and any AE measures.

Conclusion:

Procedural sedation was safe and effective in our environment. Capnometry recording did not appear to alter outcomes, although the data are incomplete.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Muskoka East-Perry Sound Health Services, Huntsville District Memorial Hospital, 100 Frank Miller Dr., Huntsville ON P1H 1H7; mensours@cogeco.ca

References

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Emergency department procedural sedation and analgesia: A Canadian Community Effectiveness and Safety Study (ACCESS)

  • Mark Mensour (a1), Robert Pineau (a2), Vic Sahai (a3) and Jennifer Michaud (a4)

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