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Effect of inhaled hypertonic saline on hospital admission rate in children with viral bronchiolitis: a randomized trial

  • Brian A. Kuzik (a1), Michael P. Flavin (a2), Steven Kent (a3), David Zielinski (a4), Charisse W. Kwan (a2), Adetayo Adeleye (a2), Bjorn C. Vegsund (a3) and Carlo Rossi (a3)...

Abstract

Objective:

We sought to determine whether inhaled 3% hypertonic saline (HS) reduces admission to hospital in ambulatory children with moderately severe viral bronchiolitis. Secondary objectives compared changes in respiratory scores before and after treatment and assessed the need for unscheduled medical intervention within 7 days.

Methods:

Children under the age of 2 years presenting with moderately severe viral bronchiolitis to the emergency department of 4 general hospitals from November 2008 to March 2009 were randomly assigned to receive 3 consecutive 4-mL doses of nebulized 3% HS (treatment group) or 0.9% normal saline (NS; control group) in a double blind fashion, each coadministered with 1 mg salbutamol. Outcome measures included the difference in hospital admission rate and changes in respiratory distress scores.

Results:

A total of 81 children (mean age 8.9 mo, range 0.7–22 mo) were assessed over 88 visits on an intention-to-treat basis. No statistically significant differences were found between treatment groups. Children in the HS group had a nonsignificant trend toward greater improvement compared with NS controls with a same-day admission rate of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9%–32%) versus 27% (95% CI 16%–42%), respectively. Respiratory Assessment Change Scores (RACS) favoured the HS group over NS controls (mean RACS 4.7 [95% CI 3.6–5.8] v. 3.7 [95% CI 2.5–4.9], respectively), although the CIs overlap and these differences were not statistically significant.

Conclusion:

The short-term use of nebulized 3% HS did not result in any statistically significant benefits, although a nonsignificant trend toward a decrease in admission rate and improvement in respiratory distress was found. A larger study would be required to determine whether these trends arise from a clinically relevant treatment effect.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

208–1 Quarry Ridge Rd., Barrie ON L4M 7G1; briankuzik@hotmail.com

References

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Keywords

Effect of inhaled hypertonic saline on hospital admission rate in children with viral bronchiolitis: a randomized trial

  • Brian A. Kuzik (a1), Michael P. Flavin (a2), Steven Kent (a3), David Zielinski (a4), Charisse W. Kwan (a2), Adetayo Adeleye (a2), Bjorn C. Vegsund (a3) and Carlo Rossi (a3)...

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