Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Does a waiting room video about what to expect during an emergency department visit improve patient satisfaction?

  • Linda Papa (a1), David C. Seaberg (a2), Elizabeth Rees (a3), Kevin Ferguson (a2), Richard Stair (a2), Bruce Goldfeder (a2) and David Meurer (a2)...

Abstract

Objective:

We created an instructional waiting room video that explained what patients should expect during their emergency department (ED) visit and sought to determine whether preparing patients using this video would 1) improve satisfaction, 2) decrease perceived waiting room times and 3) increase calls to an outpatient referral line in an ambulatory population.

Methods:

This serial cross-sectional study took place over a period of 2 months before (control) and 2 months after the introduction of an educational waiting room video that described a typical patient visit to our ED. We enrolled a convenience sample of adult patients or parents of pediatric patients who were triaged to the ED waiting room; a research assistant distributed and collected the surveys as patients were being discharged after treatment. Subjects were excluded if they were admitted. The primary outcome was overall satisfaction measured on a 5-point Likert scale, and secondary outcomes included perceived waiting room time, and the number of outpatient referral-line calls.

Results:

There were 1132 subjects surveyed: 551 prevideo and 581 postvideo. The mean age was 38 years (standard deviation [SD] 18), 61% were female and the mean ED length of stay was 5.9 hours (SD 3.6). Satisfaction scores were significantly higher postvideo, with 65% of participants ranking their visit as either “excellent” or “very good,” compared with 58.1% in the prevideo group (p = 0.019); however, perceived waiting room time was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.24). Patient calls to our specialty outpatient clinic referral line increased from 1.5 per month (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58–2.42) to 4.5 per month (95% CI 1.19–7.18) (p = 0.032). After adjusting for possible covariates, the most significant determinants of overall satisfaction were perceived waiting room time (odds ratio [OR] 0.41, 95% CI 0.34–0.48) and having seen the ED waiting room video (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06–1.86).

Conclusion:

Preparing patients for their ED experience by describing the ED process of care through a waiting room video can improve ED patient satisfaction and the knowledge of outpatient clinic resources in an ambulatory population. Future studies should research the implementation of this educational intervention in a randomized fashion.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Does a waiting room video about what to expect during an emergency department visit improve patient satisfaction?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Does a waiting room video about what to expect during an emergency department visit improve patient satisfaction?
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Does a waiting room video about what to expect during an emergency department visit improve patient satisfaction?
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Department of Emergency Medicine, Orlando Regional Medical Center 86 W. Underwood (S-200), Orlando FL 32806; lpstat@aol.com

References

Hide All
1.Kologlu, M, Agalar, F, Cakmakci, M. Emergency department information: does it effect patients’ perception and satisfaction about the care given in an emergency department? Eur J Emerg Med 1999;6:245–8.
2.Krishel, S, Baraff, LJ. Effect of emergency department information on patient satisfaction. Ann Emerg Med 1993;22:568–72.
3.Bjorvell, H, Stieg, J. Patients’ perceptions of the health care received in an emergency department. Ann Emerg Med 1991;20:734–8.
4.Corbett, SW, White, PD, Wittlake, WA. Benefits of an informational videotape for emergency department patients. Am J Emerg Med 2000;18:6771.
5.Pager, CK. Randomised controlled trial of preoperative information to improve satisfaction with cataract surgery. Br J Ophthalmol 2005;89:10–3.
6.Greimel, ER, Gappmayer-Locker, E, Girardi, FL, et al. Increasing women’s knowledge and satisfaction with cervical cancer screening. J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol 1997;18:273–9.
7.Jean Wiese, H, Boethel, C, Phillips, B, et al. CPAP compliance: video education may help! Sleep Med 2005;6:171–4.
8.Lin, PC, Lin, LC, Lin, JJ. Comparing the effectiveness of different educational programs for patients with total knee arthroplasty. Orthop Nurs 1997;16:43–9.
9.Snyder-Ramos, SA, Seintsch, H, Bottiger, BW, et al. Patient satisfaction and information gain after the preanesthetic visit: a comparison of face-to-face interview, brochure, and video. Anesth Analg 2005;100:1753–8.
10.Maller, CE, Twitty, VJ, Sauve, A. A video approach to interactive patient education. J Perianesth Nurs 1997;12:82–8.
11.Ader, DN, Seibring, AR, Bhaskar, P, et al. Information seeking and interactive videodisc preparation for third molar extraction. [discussion 31–22]. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1992;50:2731.
12.Ruthman, JL, Ferrans, CE. Efficacy of a video for teaching patients about prostate cancer screening and treatment. Am J Health Promot 2004;18:292–5.
13.Hall, MF, Press, I. Keys to patient satisfaction in the emergency department: results of a multiple facility study. Hosp Health Serv Adm 1996;41:515–32.
14.Burstin, HR, Conn, A, Setnik, G, et al. Benchmarking and quality improvement: the Harvard Emergency Department Quality Study. Am J Med 1999;107:437–49.
15.Boudreaux, ED, Ary, RD, Mandry, CV, et al. Determinants of patient satisfaction in a large, municipal ED: the role of demographic variables, visit characteristics, and patient perceptions. Am J Emerg Med 2000;18:394400.
16.Goldwag, R, Berg, A, Yuval, D, et al. Predictors of patient dissatisfaction with emergency care. Isr Med Assoc J 2002;4:603–6.
17.Thompson, DA, Yarnold, PR, Williams, DR, et al. Effects of actual waiting time, perceived waiting time, information delivery, and expressive quality on patient satisfaction in the emergency department. Ann Emerg Med 1996;28:657–65.
18.Kravitz, RL, Callahan, EJ, Azari, R, et al. Assessing patients’ expectations in ambulatory medical practice. Does the measurement approach make a difference? J Gen Intern Med 1997;12:6772.
19.Kravitz, RL, Cope, DW, Bhrany, V, et al. Internal medicine patients’ expectations for care during office visits. J Gen Intern Med 1994;9:7581.
20.Trout, A, Magnusson, AR, Hedges, JR. Patient satisfaction investigations and the emergency department: what does the literature say? Acad Emerg Med 2000;7:695709.
21.Thompson, DA, Yarnold, PR. Relating patient satisfaction to waiting time perceptions and expectations: the disconfirmation paradigm. Acad Emerg Med 1995;2:1057–62.
22.Hedges, JR, Trout, A, Magnusson, AR. Satisfied Patients Exiting the Emergency Department (SPEED). Acad Emerg Med. 2002;9:1521.
23.Cooke, J, Finneran, K. A clearing in the crowd: innovations in emergency services. Pap Ser United Hosp Fund N Y 1994;(Jan):143.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Does a waiting room video about what to expect during an emergency department visit improve patient satisfaction?

  • Linda Papa (a1), David C. Seaberg (a2), Elizabeth Rees (a3), Kevin Ferguson (a2), Richard Stair (a2), Bruce Goldfeder (a2) and David Meurer (a2)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.