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Dispatches from the front: emergency medicine teachers' perceptions of competency-based education

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2015

Glen Bandiera*
Affiliation:
Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
David Lendrum
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Calgary Regional Health Authority, Calgary, AB
*
Division of Emergency Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, Suite 1-008 Shuter Wing, 30 Bond Street, Toronto ON M5B 1W8; bandierag@smh.toronto.on.ca.

Abstract

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Objectives:

Controversy exists regarding the applicability of competency-based education during clinical rotations in emergencymedicine (EM). Little has been written about the perceptions of front-line teachers regarding one such competencybased education paradigm, the CanMEDS framework. We undertook to determine 1) what perceptions exist among frontline teachers at two academic health science emergency departments (EDs) regarding the use of the CanMEDS roles to frame what residents should learn on ED rotations and 2) how those same teachers envision practically incorporating the CanMEDS roles into feedback provided to residents.

Methods:

Teachers at two sites volunteered for a semistructured focus group study. Focus groups were moderated by an experienced qualitative researcher, and verbatim transcriptions were coded by two independent reviewers. The codes were merged into final themes. The final focus group was used to further explore issues raised and test assumptions made in the preceding groups.

Results:

In five focus groups involving 21 participants, the Medical Expert and Professional roles were seen as most relevant to an EM rotation, whereas the Health Advocate, Manager, Scholar, and Collaborator roles were least relevant. On further exploration, however, faculty identified highly relevant components of each role that they could envision teaching in an ED. Participants also felt that the framework helped highlight the breadth of physician competencies and provided structure for teaching and feedback.

Conclusions:

EM faculty find the CanMEDS framework helpful for structuring teaching and learning and that many elements of the roles, when defined, are feasible to integrate into a clinical rotation.

Type
Education • Enseignement
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2011

References

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