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Competency in Acute Resuscitation Through Successive Simulation (CARTSS): a mentor based, near-peer learning initiative

  • John R. O’Leary (a1), Natasha L. Goumeniouk (a1), Alexander S. Cormier (a1), Daniel J. Potter (a1), Filip Gilic (a1) (a2) and Erin E. Brennan (a3)...
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Abstract

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Natasha Goumeniouk, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kingston Health Sciences Centre, 76 Stuart St., Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada; E-mail: ngoumeniouk@qmed.ca

References

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1. Kaye, W, Rallis, SF, Mancini, ME, et al. The problem of poor retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills may lie with the instructor, not the learner or the curriculum. Resuscitation 1991;21(1):67-87.
2. Kaye, W, Mancini, ME. Retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills by physicians, registered nurses, and the general public. Crit Care Med 1986;14(7):620-622.
3. Niles, D, Sutton, RM, Donoghue, A, et al. “Rolling Refreshers”: a novel approach to maintain CPR psychomotor skill competence. Resuscitation 2009;80(8):909-912.
4. Cheng, A, Brown, LL, Duff, JP, et al. Improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a CPR feedback device and refresher simulations (CPR CARES Study): a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Pediatr 2015;169(2):137-144.
5. Niles, DE, Nishisaki, A, Sutton, RM, et al. Improved retention of chest compression psychomotor skills with brief “Rolling Refresher” training. Simul Healthc 2017;12(4):213-219.

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