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CJEM Debate Series: #HallwayMedicine – Our responsibility to assess patients is not limited to those in beds; emergency physicians must assess patients in the hallway and the waiting room when traditional bed spaces are unavailable

  • Grant Innes (a1), Merril Pauls (a2), Samuel G. Campbell (a3) and Paul Atkinson (a3)
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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Dr. Sam Campbell, Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, 1796 Summer St., Halifax, NS B3H 3A7; Email: Samuel.campbell@nshealth.ca

References

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15.Anonymous. Hallway medicine. Acad Emerg Med 2008;15(12): 1328–9.
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Keywords

CJEM Debate Series: #HallwayMedicine – Our responsibility to assess patients is not limited to those in beds; emergency physicians must assess patients in the hallway and the waiting room when traditional bed spaces are unavailable

  • Grant Innes (a1), Merril Pauls (a2), Samuel G. Campbell (a3) and Paul Atkinson (a3)

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