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CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: “How to make research succeed in your department: Promoting excellence in Canadian emergency medicine resident research”

  • Lisa A. Calder (a1) (a2), Riyad B. Abu-Laban (a3), Jennifer D. Artz (a4), Shelley McLeod (a5), Barbara Blackie (a6), Bijon Das (a6), Robert Woods (a7), Jeffrey J. Perry (a1) (a2), Christian Vaillancourt (a1) (a2), Ian G. Stiell (a1) (a2) and Jason R. Frank (a1)...

Abstract

Objectives

To characterize the current state of Canadian emergency medicine (EM) resident research and develop recommendations to promote excellence in this area.

Methods

We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE, Embase, and ERIC using search terms relevant to EM resident research. We conducted an online survey of EM residency program directors from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC). An expert panel reviewed these data, presented recommendations at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2014 Academic Symposium, and refined them based on feedback received.

Results

Of 654 potentially relevant citations, 35 articles were included. These were categorized into four themes: 1) expectations and requirements, 2) training and assessment, 3) infrastructure and support, and 4) dissemination. We received 31 responses from all 31 RCPSC-EM and CFPC-EM programs. The majority of EM programs reported requiring a resident scholarly project; however, we found wide-ranging expectations for the type of resident research performed and how results were disseminated, as well as the degree of completion expected. Although 93% of RCPSC-EM programs reported providing formal training on how to conduct research, only 53% of CFPC-EM programs reported doing so. Almost all programs (94%) reported having infrastructure in place to support resident research, but the nature of support was highly variable. Finally, there was marked variability regarding the number of resident-published abstracts and manuscripts.

Conclusions

Based on the literature, our national survey, and discussions with stakeholders, we offer 14 recommendations encompassing goals, expectations, training, assessment, infrastructure, and dissemination in order to improve Canadian EM resident research.

Objectifs

L’étude visait à caractériser l’état actuel de la recherche menée par les résidents en médecine d’urgence (MU) au Canada et à élaborer des recommandations afin de favoriser l’excellence dans le domaine.

Méthode

Les auteurs ont procédé à une revue systématique dans MEDLINE, Embase et ERIC à l’aide de termes d'interrogation concernant la recherche menée par les résidents en MU. Une enquête en ligne a également été réalisée parmi les directeurs de programme de résidence en MU du Collège royal des médecins et chirurgiens du Canada (CRMCC) et du Collège des médecins de famille du Canada (CMFC). Un groupe d’experts a examiné les données recueillies, a présenté des recommandations à l’occasion du Symposium sur les affaires universitaires de l’Association canadienne des médecins d’urgence de 2014 et les a reformulées en tenant compte des observations reçues.

Résultats

La recherche a permis de relever 654 mentions potentiellement pertinentes et de sélectionner 35 articles. Ceux-ci ont été divisés en quatre grands thèmes: 1) les attentes et les exigences; 2) la formation et l’évaluation; 3) l’infrastructure et le soutien; 4) la diffusion. Tous les directeurs de programme de MU du CRMCC et du CMFC, soit 31, ont répondu à l’enquête. On exige, dans la plupart des programmes, un projet de recherche érudite par les résidents; toutefois, il existe un large éventail de possibilités quant au type de recherche, aux formules de diffusion des résultats et au degré attendu de réalisation. Tandis que 93 % des directeurs de programme du CRMCC ont indiqué donner de la formation structurée sur la manière de faire de la recherche, seuls 53 % des directeurs de programme du CMFC ont indiqué en faire autant. Dans presque tous les programmes (94 %), l’on dispose d’une infrastructure de soutien à la recherche menée par les résidents, mais la nature du soutien varie énormément. Enfin, il y a des différences importantes en ce qui concerne le nombre de résumés et de textes publiés par les résidents.

Conclusions

Compte tenu de la documentation, de l’enquête nationale et des discussions avec les parties intéressées, le groupe a élaboré 14 recommandations sur les buts, les attentes, la formation, l’évaluation, l’infrastructure et la diffusion afin d’améliorer la recherche menée par les résidents en MU au Canada.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Correspondence to: Dr. Lisa Calder, Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, F658,1053 Carling Ave., Ottawa, ON K1Y 4E9; Email: lcalder@ohri.ca

References

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