Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

POPULATION STUDIES ON THE WINTER MOTH OPEROPHTERA BRUMATA (L.) (LEPIDOPTERA: GEOMETRIDAE) IN APPLE ORCHARDS IN NOVA SCOTIA1

  • A. MacPhee (a1), A. Newton (a1) and K.B. McRae (a1)

Abstract

The winter moth Operophtera brumata (L.) is a serious introduced pest of apple trees in Nova Scotia. It spread westward through orchards of the Annapolis Valley in the 1950’s and to other deciduous trees throughout Nova Scotia later. The parasites Cyzenis albicans (Fall.) and Agrypon flaveolatum (Grav.) were liberated during 1961 in Nova Scotia and gradually spread throughout the winter moth population. Population dynamics studies were conducted in insecticide-free orchards and corroborated with observations in neglected unsprayed apple trees over a wide area. The winter moth population reached a balanced level in unsprayed orchards at varying densities below the limits of its food supply, but well above an acceptable level for commercial apple production. In young orchards, where trees cover a small percentage of the ground, natural dispersal of larvae appeared to be a suppressing factor. In mature orchards mortality was density dependent during the prepupal to adult stage; mortality was partly due to parasitism and predation but also to other factors.

L’arpenteuse tardive, Operophtera brumata (L.), est un ravageur redoutable introduit dans les vergers de pommes de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Il s’est répandu à l’ouest grâce aux vergers de la vallée d’Annapolis dans les années 50 et s’est attaqué plus tard à d’autres feuillus dans toute la province. Les parasites Cyzenis albicans (Fall.) et Agrypon flaveolatum (Grav.) ont été lâchés en 1961 et se sont répandus graduellement dans toute la population d’arpenteuses. Des études sur la dynamique des populations ont été effectuées dans des vergers non traités aux insecticides et corroborées par des observations faites dans des vergers négligés non traités sur une grande superficie. La population d’arpenteuses atteint un équilibre dans les vergers non traités, à des densités variables inférieures aux limites de ses ressources alimentaires, mais de beaucoup supérieures au niveau acceptable pour la production commerciale. Dans les jeunes vergers où la frondaison ne couvre qu’un faible pourcentage du sol, la dispersion naturelle des larves semble être un facteur suppressif. Dans les vergers adultes, la mortalité est tributaire de la densité du stade prépupal au stade adulte; la mortalité est partiellement attribuable au parasitisme et à la prédation, mais aussi à d’autres facteurs.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Embree, D.G. 1965. The population dynamics of the winter moth in Nova Scotia, 1954–1962. Mem. ent. Soc. Can. 46: 157.
Holliday, N.J. 1977. Population ecology of winter moth (Operophtera brumata) on apple in relation to larval dispersal and time of bud burst. J. Appl. Ecol. 14: 803813.
Kowalski, R. 1977. Further elaboration of the winter moth population models. J. Anim. Ecol. 46: 471482.
Lord, F.T. 1972. Comparisons of the abundance of the species composing the foliage inhabiting fauna of apple trees. Can. Ent. 104: 731749.
MacPhee, A.W. 1967. The winter moth, Operophtera brumata (Lepidoptera: Geometridae), a new pest attacking apple orchards in Nova Scotia, and its cold hardiness. Can. Ent. 99: 829834.
Morris, R.F. 1959. Single-factor analysis in population dynamics. Ecology 401: 580588.
Smith, R.H. 1973. The analysis of intra-generation change in animal populations. J. Anim. Ecol. 42: 611622.
Varley, G.C., and Gradwell, G.R.. 1968. Population models for the winter moth. Symp. R. ent. Soc. London 4: 132142.

POPULATION STUDIES ON THE WINTER MOTH OPEROPHTERA BRUMATA (L.) (LEPIDOPTERA: GEOMETRIDAE) IN APPLE ORCHARDS IN NOVA SCOTIA1

  • A. MacPhee (a1), A. Newton (a1) and K.B. McRae (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed