Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Natural enemies of Anthonomus eugenii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Canada

  • R.M. Labbé (a1), R. Hilker (a1), D. Gagnier (a1), C. McCreary (a2), G.A.P. Gibson (a3), J. Fernández-Triana (a3), P.G. Mason (a3) and T.D. Gariepy (a4)...

Abstract

The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most important pest of pepper (Capsicum Linnaeus; Solanaceae) crops in North America. Native to Mexico, the southern United States of America, and Central America, it is intercepted in Canada when peppers are imported to supplement domestic production. Given the proximity of greenhouse and field production to packing facilities, this pest poses a serious risk to the cultivation of peppers in Canada. Once established, it is difficult to control because immature stages of the weevil are protected within the pepper fruit. As such, chemical control targeting these life stages is not effective, and other strategies, including biological control, may prove useful. To explore the potential for biological control options to manage the pepper weevil in areas at risk in Canada, natural enemy surveys were conducted in southern Ontario following the reports of transient, localised field populations in 2016. Parasitoids belonging to three Hymenoptera families including Pteromalidae (Jaliscoa hunteri Crawford, Pteromalus anthonomi Ashmead), Eupelmidae (Eupelmus pulchriceps Cameron), and Braconidae (Nealiolus Mason species, Bracon Fabricius species) were reared from infested field-collected pepper fruits. Together, these new natural enemy records could facilitate the exploration and development of novel agents for the biological control of the pepper weevil.

Copyright

Corresponding author

1 Corresponding author (e-mail: Roselyne.Labbe@agr.gc.ca)

Footnotes

Hide All

Subject editor: Christopher Cutler

Footnotes

References

Hide All
Addesso, K.M., McAuslane, H.J., Stansly, P.A., and Schuster, D.J. 2007. Host-marking by female pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii . Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 125: 269276.
Aguilar, R. and Servin, R. 2000. Alternate wild host of the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano in Baja Calofornia Sur, Mexico. Southwestern Entomology, 25: 153154.
Baker, R., Eyre, D., Matthews-Berry, S., Anderson, H., and MacLeod, A. 2012. Rapid pest risk analysis for Anthonomus eugenii (the pepper weevil) [online]. Available from https://secure.fera.defra.gov.uk/phiw/riskRegister/downloadExternalPra.cfm?id=3817 [accessed 22 June 2016].
Campbell, R.E. 1924. Injuries to peppers in California by Anthonomus eugenii Cano. Journal of Economic Entomology, 17: 645647.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency. 2011. Anthonomois eugenii (pepper weevil) pest risk management document [online]. RMD-10-28. Available from www.inspection.gc.ca/plants/plant-protection/directives/risk-management/rmd-10-28/eng/1304792116992/1304821683305 [accessed 22 June 2016].
Cano, D. 1894. El barrenillo. La Naturaleza, 2: 377379.
Clausen, C.P. 1978. Curculionidae. In Introduced parasites and predators of arthropod pests and weeds. A world review. Agriculture Handbook. Edited by C.P. Clausen. United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America. Pp. 259276.
Cortez, E.M., Cabanillas, E.D., and Armenta, D.B. 2005. Parasitoids and natural parasitism of the pepper weevil Anthonomous eugenii in north Sinaloa, Mexico. Southwestern Entomologist, 30: 181190.
Costello, R.A. and Gillespie, D.R. 1993. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano as a greenhouse pest in Canada. International Organisation for Biological and Integrated Control, West Palaearctic Regional Section Bulletin, 16: 3134.
Cross, W.H. and Chesnut, T.L. 1971. Arthropod parasites of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis: 1. An annotated list. Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 64: 516527.
Fernández, D.C., Sinclair, B.C., Van Laerhoven, S., and Labbé, R. 2017. Biology and overwintering potential of the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). International Organisation for Biological and Integrated Control, West Palaearctic Regional Section Bulletin, 124: 224229.
Folmer, O., Black, M., Hoeh, W., Lutz, R., and Vrijenhoek, R. 1994. DNA primers for amplification of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I from diverse metazoan invertebrates. Molecular Marine Biology and Biotechnology, 3: 294299.
Frantz, G. and Mellinger, H.C. 1998. Measuring integrated pest management adoption in South Florida vegetable crops. Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society, 132: 115.
Gibson, G.A.P. 2011. The species of Eupelmus (Eupelmus) Dalman and Eupelmus (Episolindelia) Girault (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) in North America north of Mexico. Zootaxa, 2951: 197.
Gibson, G.A.P. 2013. Revision of the species of Jaliscoa Bouček within a review of the identity, relationships and membership of Jaliscoa, Catolaccus Thomson, Eurydinoteloides Girault, Lyrcus Walker and Trimeromicrus Gahan (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). Zootaxa, 3612: 185.
Gibson, G.A.P. 2016. Revision of the Neotropical genus Macreupelmus Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Eupelmidae). Zootaxa, 4161: 81115.
Hellmann, J.J., Byers, J.E., Bierwagen, B.G., and Dukes, J.S. 2008. Five potential consequences of climate change for invasive species. Conservation Biology, 22: 534543.
Hunter, W.D. and Hinds, W.E. 1905. The Mexican cotton boll weevil. United States Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology, Bulletin, 51: 1181.
Ingerson-Mahar, J., Eichinger, B., and Holmstrom, K. 2015. How does pepper weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) become an important pepper pest in New Jersey? Journal of Integrated Pest Management, 6: 123.
Kimura, M. 1980. A simple method for estimating evolutionary rates of base substitutions through comparative studies of nucleotide sequences. Journal of Molecular Evolution, 16: 111120.
Nederlandse Voedsel-en Warenautoriteit. 2013. Pest risk analysis for Anthonomus eugenii [online]. Available from https://english.nvwa.nl/documents/risicobeoordeling/plantenziekten/archief/2016m/pest-risk-analysis-anthonomus-eugenii [accessed 11 January 2018].
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs. 2017. Strawberry clipper weevil. www.omafra.gov.on.ca/IPM/english/strawberries/insects/strawberry-clipper-weevil.html [accessed 30 April 2017].
Pierce, W.D. 1908. Studies of parasites of the cotton boll weevil. United States Department of Agriculture Bureau Entomology Bulletin, 73: 631663.
Provancher, L. 1883. Petite faune entomologique du Canada et particulièrement de la province de Québec. Vol. II. Comprenant les Orthoptères, les Névroptères et les Hyménoptères. C. Darveau, Ville de Québec, Québec, Canada.
Rodríguez-Leyva, E. 2006. Life history of Triaspis eugenii Wharton and López-Martínez (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and evaluation of its potential for biological control of pepper weevil Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Ph.D. dissertation. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
Rodríguez-Leyva, E., Leyva, J.L., Gomez, V., Barcenas, N.M., and Elzen, G.W. 2000. Biology of Catolaccus hunteri (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a parasitoid of pepper weevil and boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 93: 862868.
Rodríguez-Leyva, E., Stansly, P.A., Schuster, D.J., and Bravo-Mosqueda, E. 2007. Diversity and distribution of parasitoids of Anthonomus eugenii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) from Mexico and prospects for biological control. Florida Entomologist, 90: 693702.
Schuster, D.J. 2012. Response of Catolaccus hunteri (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to colored sticky traps in the laboratory. Florida Entomologist, 95: 501502.
Servín, R., Aguilar, R., Martínez, J.L., Troyo, E., and Ortega, A. 2002. Monitoring of resistance to three insecticidas on pepper weevil (Anthonomus eugenii) in populations from Baja California Sur, Mexico. Interciencia, 27: 691694.
Speranza, S., Colonnelli, E., Garonna, A.P., and Laudonia, S. 2014. First record of Anthonomus eugenii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Italy. Florida Entomologist, 97: 844–845. Available from http://journals.fcla.edu/flaent/article/view/83245 [accessed 22 June 2017].
Toapanta, M.A. 2001. Population ecology, life history, and biological control of the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Ph.D. dissertation. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
Walsh, P.S., Metzger, D.A., and Higuchi, R. 1991. Chelex 100 as a medium for simple extraction of DNA for PCR-based typing from forensic material. BioTechniques, 10: 506513.
Wharton, R.A. and López-Martinez, V. 2000. A new species of Triaspis haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitic on the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, 102: 794801.
Wilson, R.J. 1986. Observations on the behavior and host relations of the pepper weevil Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Florida. University of Florida, M.S. thesis. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
Yu, D.S.K. 2018. Taxapad Ichneumonoidea (version May 2009). In Species 2000 and ITIS Catalogue of Life [online]. Edited by Y. Roskov, L. Abucay, T. Orrell, D. Nicolson, N. Bailly, P.M. Kirk, et al. Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands. Available from www.catalogueoflife.org/col [accessed 30 January 2018].

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed