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Life-History and Habits in Newfoundland of Swammerdamia lutarea (Haw.) (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), a Pest New to North America1

  • Ray F. Morris (a1)

Extract

In June, 1954, hawthorn trees and shrubs in St. John's, Newfoundland, were severely attacked by small leaf-eating caterpillars. Larvae were talzen from a hawthorn tree, Cratageus sp., at Bowring Park, St. John's West, during the first week of July, 1954, and reared in the laboratory. Moths that emerged were identified as of Swammerdamia lutarea (Haw.) by Dr. T. N. Freeman, Entomology Research Institute, Canada Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, who also noted (in litt.) that this was apparently the first record of the species in North America. Dr. L. G. Davis (in litt.), Economic Insect Survey Section, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., later confirmed this observation. Swammerdamia lutarea is now common throughout St. John's and has also been found at Brigus, approximately 50 miles to the west.

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References

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Association of Applied Biologists. 1952. Common names of British insects and other pests. Part Two. London, England.
Eckstein, K. 1933. Die Schmetterlinge Deutschlands. 5. Die Kleinschmetterlinge Deutschlands. K. G. Lutz Verlong, Stuttgart.
Meyrick, E. 1927. A revised handbook of British Lepidoptera. Watkins and Doncaster, London, England.
Parfitt, E. 1878. The fauna of Devon: Lepidoptera. Rept. Devonshire Assoc. Advance. Sci. 10: 310588.
Stainton, H. T. 1859. A manual of British butterflies and moths. Vol. II. J. Van Voorst, London.

Life-History and Habits in Newfoundland of Swammerdamia lutarea (Haw.) (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), a Pest New to North America1

  • Ray F. Morris (a1)

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