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EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE DURING MAY TO AUGUST ON TERMINATION OF PROLONGED DIAPAUSE IN THE DOUGLAS-FIR CONE MOTH (LEPIDOPTERA: TORTRICIDAE)

  • G.E. Miller (a1) and D.S. Ruth (a1)

Extract

The Douglas-fir cone moth, Barbara coljaxiana (Kearfott) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), has the capacity for prolonged diapause, i.e. diapause for two or more winters (Hedlin 1960). This diapause allows for temporal spacing of populations and reduction of intraspecific competition. Specifically, when cone crops are small, excessive moth densities can occur and cause conelet mortality prior to completion of feeding by cone moth larvae, which results in moth mortality. If all moths emerged each year, moth-caused destruction of the conelet population, particularly in years of light production, would have drastic effects on the moth population.

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References

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Eis, S. 1973. Cone production of Douglas-fir and grand fir and its climatic requirements. Can. J. For. Res. 3: 6170.
Hedlin, A.F. 1960. On the life history of the Douglas-fir cone moth, Barbara colfaxiana (Kft.) (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae), and one of its parasites, Glypta evetriae Cush. (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). Can. Ent. 92: 826834.
Hedlin, A.F., Miller, G.E., and Ruth, D.S.. 1982. Induction of prolonged diapause in Barbara colfaxiana (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae): correlations with cone crops and weather. Can. Ent. 114: 465471.
Sahota, T.S., Ibaraki, A., and Farris, S.H.. 1985. Pharate-adult diapause of Barbara colfaxiana (Kft.): differentiation of 1- and 2-year dormancy. Can. Ent. 117: 873876.

EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE DURING MAY TO AUGUST ON TERMINATION OF PROLONGED DIAPAUSE IN THE DOUGLAS-FIR CONE MOTH (LEPIDOPTERA: TORTRICIDAE)

  • G.E. Miller (a1) and D.S. Ruth (a1)

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