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Variability in the parasitoid community associated with galls of Diplolepis variabilis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae): a test of the distance decay hypothesis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2012

Abstract

Galls of Diplolepis variabilis (Bassett) (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) on their host plant Rosa woodsii Lindley (Rosaceae) support a diverse community of parasitoid and inquiline wasps that exploit the gall inducer and the gall itself. Here, we studied quantitative variation in local structure of the gall community in the Okanagan Valley of southern British Columbia, Canada, from the United States border north, to test the hypothesis that dispersal limitation would generate a distance decay in gall community similarity. We also explored gall community richness in relation to latitude, as the northern range limit of the gall inducer occurs within our study area. We found that gall communities exhibited strikingly similar composition across the study region, with most of the major inquilines and parasitoids present across the gall's range. However, the increased richness of rare parasitoid taxa near the northern range limits of D. variabilis generated a marginally significant positive relationship between gall community richness and latitude. Overall, our study suggests that dispersal constraints do not influence the composition of the Diplolepis Geoffroy gall community at regional scales, and that gall communities offer useful models for studying the association between community structure and range limits.

Résumé

Les galles de Diplolepis variabilis (Bassett) (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) sur leur hôte Rosa woodsi Lindley (Rosaceae) contiennent une communauté diverse de guêpes parasitoïdes et inquilines qui exploitent l'insecte galligène et la galle elle-même. Nous étudions la variation quantitative de la structure locale de la communauté des galles dans la vallée de l'Okanagan du sud de la Colombie-Britannique, à partir de la frontière des États-Unis vers le nord, afin de tester l'hypothèse selon laquelle la restriction de la dispersion crée un déclin de la similarité entre les communautés des galles en fonction de la distance. Nous examinons aussi la richesse des communautés des galles en fonction de la latitude, parce que la limite nord de l'aire de répartition de l'insecte galligène se trouve dans notre région d’étude. Les communautés des galles présentent des compositions remarquablement semblables dans toute la région d’étude et la plupart des inquilins et des parasites importants sont présents sur toute l'aire de répartition de la galle. Cependant, la richesse accrue de taxons rares de parasitoïdes près des limites nordiques de l'aire de répartition de D. variabilis produit une relation positive significative entre la richesse de la communauté des galles et la latitude. Globalement, notre étude indique que les contraintes à la dispersion n'influencent pas la composition de la communauté des galles de Diplolepis Geoffroy aux échelles régionales et que les communautés des galles représentent des modèles utiles pour l’étude des associations entre la structure des communautés et les limites des aires de répartition.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 2012

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Variability in the parasitoid community associated with galls of Diplolepis variabilis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae): a test of the distance decay hypothesis
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Variability in the parasitoid community associated with galls of Diplolepis variabilis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae): a test of the distance decay hypothesis
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