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SUCROSE INGESTION BY ZEIRAPHERA CANADENSIS MUT. & FREE. (LEPIDOPTERA: TORTRICIDAE) INCREASES LONGEVITY AND LIFETIME FECUNDITY BUT NOT OVIPOSITION RATE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Allan L. Carroll
Affiliation:
Department of Forest Resources, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 6C2
Dan T. Quiring
Affiliation:
Department of Forest Resources, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 6C2

Abstract

In the laboratory, the longevity and fecundity of female Zeiraphera canadensis Mut. & Free. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) given access to a 10% sucrose solution and water was greater than that of females provided only water. The presence or absence of sucrose did not affect oviposition rate during the first 10 days post-emergence, after which most females denied sucrose died. The enhanced fecundity of sucrose-fed females was due to their increased longevity and, hence, longer oviposition period. Greater longevity, combined with a decrease in oviposition rate and egg viability with age, resulted in a lower average lifetime oviposition rate and percentage viable egg production for females provided sucrose. Although carbohydrate ingestion resulted in increased fecundity and longevity in the laboratory, its effect in nature may be minimal because Z. canadensis usually does not live more than 10 days under field conditions.

Résumé

La longévité et fécondité de Zeiraphera canadensis Mut. & Free. (Lepidoptera : Tortricidae) en laboratoire étaient plus grande chez les femelles ayant accès à une solution de 10% sucrose et à de l’eau, que celle des femelles ayant uniquement accès à de l’eau. Cependant, la presence où l’absence de sucrose n’a pas affecté le taux d’oviposition pendant les 10 premiers jours, après lesquels la plupart des femelles prevées de sucrose sont mortes. La fécondité améliorée des femelles nourrit au sucrose était due à la période d’oviposition prolongé attribuable à une longévité plus grande. Toutefois, bien que l’ingestion de carbohydrates a causé l’augmentation de la période de fécondité et de longévité en laboratoire, son effet en nature est probablement minimal due au fait que Z. canadensis ne vit habituellement pas plus de 10 jours en conditions naturelles.

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Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1992

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SUCROSE INGESTION BY ZEIRAPHERA CANADENSIS MUT. & FREE. (LEPIDOPTERA: TORTRICIDAE) INCREASES LONGEVITY AND LIFETIME FECUNDITY BUT NOT OVIPOSITION RATE
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SUCROSE INGESTION BY ZEIRAPHERA CANADENSIS MUT. & FREE. (LEPIDOPTERA: TORTRICIDAE) INCREASES LONGEVITY AND LIFETIME FECUNDITY BUT NOT OVIPOSITION RATE
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SUCROSE INGESTION BY ZEIRAPHERA CANADENSIS MUT. & FREE. (LEPIDOPTERA: TORTRICIDAE) INCREASES LONGEVITY AND LIFETIME FECUNDITY BUT NOT OVIPOSITION RATE
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