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Semiochemical-mediated host selection by Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attacking horticultural tree crops: a review of basic and applied science

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2020

Christopher M. Ranger
Affiliation:
United States Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service, Horticultural Insects Research Lab, 1680 Madison Avenue, Wooster, Ohio, 44691, United States of America
Michael E. Reding
Affiliation:
United States Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service, Horticultural Insects Research Lab, 1680 Madison Avenue, Wooster, Ohio, 44691, United States of America
Karla Addesso
Affiliation:
Otis L. Floyd Nursery Research Center, Tennessee State University, College of Agriculture, 472 Cadillac Lane, McMinnville, Tennessee, 37110, United States of America
Matthew Ginzel
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, Purdue University, 901 W. State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47907, United States of America
Davide Rassati
Affiliation:
Department of Agronomy, Food, Natural Resources, Animals and Environment (DAFNAE), University of Padova, Viale dell’ Università, 16, 35020, Legnaro, Padova, Italy
Corresponding

Abstract

Exotic ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the tribe Xyleborini include destructive pests of trees growing in horticultural cropping systems. Three species are especially problematic: Xylosandrus compactus (Eichhoff), Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky), and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford). Due to similarities in their host tree interactions, this mini-review focuses on these three species with the goal of describing their host-selection behaviour, characterising associated semiochemicals, and assessing how these interactions relate to their management. All three of these Xylosandrus spp. attack a broad range of trees and shrubs. Physiologically stressed trees are preferentially attacked by X. crassiusculus and X. germanus, but the influence of stress on host selection by X. compactus is less clear. Ethanol is emitted from weakened trees in response to a variety of stressors, and it represents an important attractant for all three species. Other host-derived compounds tested are inconsistent or inactive. Verbenone inhibits attraction to ethanol, but the effect is inconsistent and does not prevent attacks. Integrating repellents and attractants into a push–pull management strategy has been ineffective for reducing attacks but could be optimised further. Overall, maintaining host vigour and minimising stress-induced ethanol are keys for managing these insects, particularly X. crassiusculus and X. germanus.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of Canada.

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Footnotes

Subject editor: Barbara Bentz

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Semiochemical-mediated host selection by Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attacking horticultural tree crops: a review of basic and applied science
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