Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Semiochemical-mediated aggregation of the ambrosia beetle Trypodendron betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 January 2020

Susanne Kühnholz
Affiliation:
Beim Fohrhäldele 7, 88400 Biberach an der Riss, Germany
Regine Gries
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6, Canada
John H. Borden
Affiliation:
JHB Consulting, 6552 Carnegie Street, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5B 1Y3, Canada Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6, Canada
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Porapak Q-captured volatiles from both sexes of Trypodendron betulae Swaine (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) excised from newly attacked logs of paper birch, Betula papyrifera Marshall (Betulaceae), as well as volatiles from unattacked birch logs, were analysed by coupled gas chromatographic electroantennographic detection analysis. Active compounds were identified by gas chromatographic mass spectroscopy. The enantiomeric ratio of 6-ethenyl-2,2,6-trimethyloxan-3-ol (linalool oxide pyranoid) was determined using a Cyclodex B column. Field-trapping experiments disclosed that the female-produced aggregation pheromone of T. betulae is a blend of the (3S,6R)-trans- and (3R,6R)-cis-linalool oxide pyranoid. Trap catches were synergistically increased when the pheromone was combined with both the host volatile ethanol and with conophthorin, which was found in female beetles as well as host volatiles. Use of linalool oxide pyranoid reproductively isolates T. betulae from sympatric Trypodendron Stephens species for which only (+)-lineatin has been identified as an aggregation pheromone.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
© 2020 Entomological Society of Canada

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

Subject editor: Andrew Graves

References

Arn, H., Städler, E., and Rauscher, S. 1975. The electroantennographic detector-a selective and sensitive tool in the gas chromatographic analysis of insect pheromones. Zeitschrift für Naturforschung, 33c: 722725.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beck, J.J. 2013. Conophthorin from almond host plant and fungal spores and its ecological relation to navel orangeworm: a natural products chemist’s perspective. Journal of the Mexican Chemical Society, 57: 6972.Google Scholar
Birgersson, G., DeBarr, G.L., de Groot, P., Dalusky, M.J., Pierce, H.D., Borden, J.H., et al. 1995. Pheromones in white pine cone beetle, Conophthorus coniperda (Schwarz) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). Journal of Chemical Ecology, 21: 143167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borden, J.H., Lindgren, B.S., and Chong, L. 1980. Ethanol and α-pinene as synergists for the aggregation pheromones of two Gnathotrichus species. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 10: 290292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borg-Karlson, A.-K., Unelius, C.R., Valterova, I., and Nilsson, L.A. 1996. Floral fragrance chemistry in the early flowering shrub Daphna mezerum . Phytochemistry, 41: 14771483.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Byrne, J.A., Gore, W.E., Pearce, G.T., and Silverstein, R.M. 1975. Porapak Q collection of airborne organic compounds serving as models for insect pheromones. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 1: 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cade, S.C., Hrutfiord, B.F., and Gara, R.I. 1970. Identification of a primary attractant for Gnathotrichus sulcatus isolated from western hemlock logs. Journal of Economic Entomology, 63: 10141015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chapman, J.A. 1966. The effect of attack by the ambrosia beetle Trypodendron lineatum (Olivier) on log attractiveness. The Canadian Entomologist, 98: 5059.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chikashita, H., Hirao, K., and Itoh, K. 1993. Stereoselective synthesis of trans isomers of a volatile compound isolated from elm bark beetle “Pteleobius vittatus” via stereospecific cyclodehydration route. Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan, 66: 17381742.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Day, R.W. and Quinn, G.P. 1989. Comparison of treatments after an analysis of variance in ecology. Ecological Monographs, 59: 433463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Francke, W., Himdorf, G., and Reith, W. 1979. Alkyl-1,6-dioxapiro[4,5]-decanes – a new class of pheromones. Naturwissenschaften, 66: 618619.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Graham, K. 1968. Anaerobic induction of primary chemical attractancy for ambrosia beetles. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 46: 905908.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gries, G., Gries, R., and Borden, J.H. 1992. 3,3,7-Trimethyl-1,3,5-cycloheptatriene in the volatiles of female mountain pine beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae . Naturwissenschaften, 79: 2778.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Helms, A.M., De Moraes, C.M., Tröger, A., Alborn, H.T., Francke, W., Tooker, J.F., and Mescher, M.C. 2017. Identification of an insect-produced olfactory cue that primes plant defenses. Nature Communications, 8: article 337, 19. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-00335-8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hoover, S.E.R., Lindgren, B.S., Keeling, C.I., and Slessor, K.N. 2000. Enantiomer preference of Trypodendron lineatum and effect of pheromone dose and trap length on response to lineatin-baited traps in interior British Columbia. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 26: 667677.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huber, D.P.W., Gries, R., Borden, J.H., and Pierce, H.D. 1999. Two pheromones of coniferophagous bark beetles found in the bark of nonhost angiosperms. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 25: 805816.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Humble, L.M. 2001. Invasive bark and wood-boring beetles in British Columbia, Canada. In Protection of world forests from insect pests: advances in research, papers presented at the XXI IUFRO World Congress, Kuala Lumpur. Edited by E., Alfaro, K., Day, S., Salom, K.S.S., Nair, H., Evans, A., Liebhold, et al. International Union of Forest Research Organizations World Series, 11. International Union of Forest Research Organizations, Vienna, Austria. Pp. 6977.Google Scholar
Kelsey, R.G. 1994. Ethanol synthesis in Douglas-fir logs felled in November, January and March and its relationship to ambrosia beetle attack. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 28: 20962104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelsey, R.G. and Joseph, G. 1999. Ethanol and ambrosia beetles in Douglas-fir logs exposed or protected from rain. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 25: 27932809.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelsey, R.G. and Joseph, G. 2003. Ethanol in ponderosa pine as an indicator of physiological injury from fire and its relationship to secondary beetles. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 33: 870884.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klein, E., Farnov, H., and Rojahn, W. 1964. Die Chemie der Linalool-oxide. European Journal of Organic Chemistry, 675: 7382.Google Scholar
Klimetzek, D., Vité, J.P., and König, E. 1981. Über das Verhalten mitteleurpäischer Trypodendron-Arten gegen gegenüber natürlichen und synthetischen Lockstoffen. Allegmeine Forst- und Jagdzeitung, 152: 6470.Google Scholar
Kühnholz, S. 2004. Chemical ecology and mechanisms of reproductive isolation in ambrosia beetles. Ph.D. thesis. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. Available from http://summit.sfu.ca/item/8474 [accessed 4 December 2019].Google Scholar
Lindgren, B.S. 1983. A multiple funnel trap for scolytid beetles (Coleoptera). The Canadian Entomologist, 115: 299302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lindgren, B.S., Hoover, S.E.R., MacIsaac, A.M., Keeling, C.I., and Slessor, K.N. 2000. Lineatin enantiomer preference, flight periods, and effect of pheromone concentration and trap length on three sympatric species of Trypodendron (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). The Canadian Entomologist, 132: 877887.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacConnell, J.G., Borden, J.H., Silverstein, R.M., and Stokkink, E. 1977. Isolation and tentative identification of lineatin, a pheromone from the frass of Trypodendron lineatum (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). Journal of Chemical Ecology, 3: 549561.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Méou, A., Bouanah, N., Archales, A., Zhang, X.M., Guglielmetti, R., and Furtoss, R. 1991. Synthesis of all four stereoisomers of enantiomerically pure tetrahydro-2,2,6,-trimethyl-6-vinyl-2H-pyran-3-ol. Synthesis, 9: 681682.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, D.R., Dodds, K.J., Hoebeke, E.R., Poland, T.M., and Willhite, E.A. 2015. Variation in effects of conophthorin on catches of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ethanol-baited traps in the United States. Journal of Economic Entomology, 108: 183191.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moeck, H.A. 1970. Ethanol as the primary attractant for the ambrosia beetle Trypodendron lineatum (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). The Canadian Entomologist, 102: 985995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morewood, W.D., Simmonds, K.E., Gries, R., Allison, J.D., and Borden, J.H. 2003. Disruption by conophthorin of the kairomonal response of sawyer beetles to bark beetle pheromones. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 29: 21152129.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mori, K. and Puapoomchareon, P. 1988. Synthesis of all four stereoisomers of tetrahydro-2,2,6 trimethyl-2H-pyran-3-ol, a volatile compound from elm bark beetle Pteleobius vittatus . Liebigs Annalen der Chemie, 1988: 175177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nijholt, W.W. and Schönherr, J. 1976. Chemical response behavior of Scolytidae in West Germany and western Canada. Canadian Forestry Service, Pacific Forestry Centre Research Report, 32: 3132.Google Scholar
Pierce, H.D., Borden, J.H., and Oehlschlager, A.C. 1981. Olfactory response to beetle produced volatiles and host-food attractants by Oryzaephilus surinamensis and O. mercator . Canadian Journal of Zoology, 59: 19801990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plettner, E. 2002. Insect pheromone olfaction: new targets for the design of species-selective pest control. Current Medical Chemistry, 9: 10751085.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ranger, C.M., Reding, M.E., Persad, A.B., and Herms, D.A. 2010. Ability of stress-related volatiles to attract and induce attacks by Xylosandrus germanus and other ambrosia beetles. Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 12: 177185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ranger, C.M., Tobin, P.C., and Reding, M.E. 2015. Ubiquitous volatile compound facilitate efficient host location by a non-native ambrosia beetle. Biological Invasions, 17: 675686.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rudinsky, J.A. and Daterman, G.E. 1964. Response of the ambrosia beetle Trypodendron lineatum (Olivier) to a female-produced pheromone. Zeitschrift für angewandte Entomologie, 54: 300303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sasaerila, Y., Gries, R., Gries, G., Khaskin, G., King, S., Takács, S., and Hardi, . 2003. Sex pheromone component of male Tirathiba mundella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Chemoecology, 13: 8993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schurig, V., Weber, R., Klimetzek, D., Kohnle, U., and Mori, K. 1982. Enantiomeric composition of ‘Lineatin’ in three sympatric ambrosia beetles. Naturwissenschaften, 69: 602603.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shore, T.L. and McLean, J.A. 1983. A further evaluation of the interaction between the pheromone and two host kairomones of the ambrosia beetles, Trypodendron lineatum (Olivier) and Gnathotrichus sulcatus (LeConte). The Canadian Entomologist, 115: 15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Slessor, K.N., Oehlschlager, A.C., Johnston, B.D., Pierce, H.D., Grewal, S.K., and Wickremesinghe, L.K.G. 1980. Lineatin: regioselective synthesis and resolution leading to the chiral pheromone of Trypodendron lineatum . Journal of Organic Chemistry, 45: 22902297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
van den Drool, H. and Kratz, P.D. 1963. A generalization of the retention index system including linear temperature program. Journal of Chromatography, 2: 463471.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vité, J.P. and Bakke, A. 1979. Synergism of chemical and physical stimuli in host colonization by an ambrosia beetle. Naturwissenschaften, 66: 528529.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, D., Ando, K., Morita, K., Kubota, K., and Kobayashi, A. 1994. Optical isomers of linalool and linalool oxides in tea aroma. Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, 58: 20502053.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, S.L. 1982. The bark and ambrosia beetles of North and Central America (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), a taxonomic monograph. Great Basin Naturalist Memoirs 6. Bringham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States of America.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 6
Total number of PDF views: 58 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 22nd January 2020 - 22nd January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-rm8z7 Total loading time: 0.487 Render date: 2021-01-22T12:46:39.984Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Semiochemical-mediated aggregation of the ambrosia beetle Trypodendron betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Semiochemical-mediated aggregation of the ambrosia beetle Trypodendron betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Semiochemical-mediated aggregation of the ambrosia beetle Trypodendron betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *