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Semiochemical-based integrated pest management of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in British Columbia’s forest industry: implemented in 1982 and still running

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2020

John H. Borden
Affiliation:
JHB Consulting, 6552 Carnegie Street, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5B 1Y3, Canada Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6, Canada
Eveline Stokkink
Affiliation:
Woodstock Management Inc., 2065 Bluebell Terrace, Nanaimo, British Columbia, V0S 2P9, Canada
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Three species of ambrosia beetles (Trypodendron lineatum (Olivier), Gnathotrichus sulcatus (LeConte), and G. retusus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)) have been estimated to cause annual losses of $95–$189 million in degrade of logs and lumber on the British Columbia coast, in Canada. A consultant-run semiochemical-based integrated pest management programme was implemented in 1982 against these beetles, following fulfilment of four prerequisites: (1) presence of receptive potential clients, (2) availability of semiochemical lures, (3) invention of an operational trap, and (4) proof of concept of mass trapping technology. The programme is based on two broad strategies: maintain the problem at a tolerable level and, if necessary, reduce the problem to a tolerable level. One measure of effectiveness over 12 years of mass trapping at a dryland sort near Sooke, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, was 16.4 million beetles trapped and an estimated five to one benefit-to-cost ratio. Despite success, several factors have conspired to reduce the programme from 50 sites serviced in early years to 7 in 2018. Timber companies in British Columbia are currently showing renewed interest and are taking steps to incorporate the integrated pest management programme as a formal component of their overall operations.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of Canada

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Footnotes

Invited presentation in symposium entitled “Management of bark and ambrosia beetles with semiochemicals,” Steven Seybold and Christopher J. Fettig, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Co-Chairs, 2018 ESA, ESC and ESBC Joint Annual Meeting, 11–14 November 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Subject editor: Deepa Pureswaran

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Semiochemical-based integrated pest management of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in British Columbia’s forest industry: implemented in 1982 and still running
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