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PHORETIC MITES FOUND ON BEETLES ASSOCIATED WITH STORED GRAIN IN MANITOBA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Philip S. Barker
Affiliation:
Agriculture Canada Research Station, 195 Dafoe Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2M9

Abstract

Mites of 10 genera and one undescribed taxon of Pyemotidae were found on specimens of 10 genera of beetles of farm-stored grain or grain residues. Four species of the mites are known to be associated with stored products. Almost 10% of beetles carried mites. Most of the mites were found on the abdominal tergites, under the wings of the beetles, but Tarsonemus spp. were found on external surfaces of beetles. Hypopi of Acarus farris (Ouds.) are recorded for the first time as subelytral phoronts of grain beetles. Mites can occasionally be found in fungal mycelia attached to beetles.

Résumé

On a trouvé 10 genres d’acariens et un taxon nouveau d’acarien trouvés sur 10 genres de coléoptères qui se peuvent trouver dans le grain entreposé, où dans résidus de récoltes entreposés dans les greniers des fermes. La proportion des coléoptères qui ont porté des acariens monte au 9.9%. Avec l’exception du genre Tarsonemus, la plupart des acariens ont été trouvés sur les tergites abdominales, sous les ailes des coléoptères. On a trouvé, pour la première fois des hypopes de Acarus farris (Ouds.) sous les élytre des coléoptères. Parfois on peut trouver des acariens attrapés dans mycélium fongueuse attachés aux coléoptères.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1993

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PHORETIC MITES FOUND ON BEETLES ASSOCIATED WITH STORED GRAIN IN MANITOBA
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