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INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON SURVIVAL AND RATE OF DEVELOPMENT OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE), A PARASITE OF THE ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE (HYMENOPTERA: MEGACHILIDAE)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

G.H. Whitfield
Affiliation:
Agriculture Canada Research Station, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1
K.W. Richards
Affiliation:
Agriculture Canada Research Station, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1

Abstract

Incidence of parasitism by Pteromalus venustus Walker in populations of the alfalfa leafcutter bee, Megachile rotundata (F.), in western Canada from 1976 to 1983 was found to average ca. 1%. An average of 17.4 parasite adults emerged from each host cocoon and the ratio of males to females was 1:1. Temperature-dependent development and survival at 8 constant temperatures are described. The range of temperatures for greatest survival of the parasite (30–32 °C) coincided with the recommended incubation temperatures for cocoons of the leafcutter bee. Development data fitted a 4-parameter development model. Linear regression of development rate versus temperature provided estimates of base temperature and development time in degree-days for the egg, larval, pupal, and combined stages.

Résumé

On a trouvé que l'incidence du parasitisme des populations de l'abeille découpeuse de la luzerne, Megachile rotundata (F.), par Pteromalus venustus Walker dans l'ouest canadien de 1976 à 1983 était de 1% en moyenne. En moyenne, 17,4 parasites adultes ont émergé de chaque cocon de l'hôte, dans un rapport mâle : femelle de 1 : 1. On décrit la réponse du développement et la survie à 8 température constantes. L'écart des températures les plus favorables à la survie du parasite (30–32 °C) coïncide avec les températures recommandées pour l'incubation des oeufs de l'abeille découpeuse. Les données de la réponse du développement ont été ajustées à un modèle à 4 paramètres. Une régression linéaire du taux de développement en fonction de la température a fourni des estimés du seuil thermique et du temps physiologique de développement en degrés-jours pour les stades oeuf, larve, pupe et pour leur ensemble.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1985

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INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON SURVIVAL AND RATE OF DEVELOPMENT OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE), A PARASITE OF THE ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE (HYMENOPTERA: MEGACHILIDAE)
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INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON SURVIVAL AND RATE OF DEVELOPMENT OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE), A PARASITE OF THE ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE (HYMENOPTERA: MEGACHILIDAE)
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INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON SURVIVAL AND RATE OF DEVELOPMENT OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE), A PARASITE OF THE ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE (HYMENOPTERA: MEGACHILIDAE)
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