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HOST SPECIES EFFECTS ON PARASITIZATION BY A SYRIAN POPULATION OF DIAERETIELLA RAPAE M’INTOSH (HYMENOPTERA: APHIDIIDAE)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

N.C. Elliott
Affiliation:
USDA, ARS, SPA, Plant Science Research Laboratory, 1301 North Western Road, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA 74075
B.W. French
Affiliation:
USDA, ARS, SPA, Plant Science Research Laboratory, 1301 North Western Road, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA 74075
D.K. Reed
Affiliation:
USDA, ARS, SPA, Plant Science Research Laboratory, 1301 North Western Road, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA 74075
J.D. Burd
Affiliation:
USDA, ARS, SPA, Plant Science Research Laboratory, 1301 North Western Road, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA 74075
S.D. Kindler
Affiliation:
USDA, ARS, SPA, Plant Science Research Laboratory, 1301 North Western Road, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA 74075

Extract

Diaeretiella rapae M'Intosh is a cosmopolitan parasitoid of several pest aphid species in agroecosystems, including the Russian what aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko) (Mackauer and Stary 1967). In recent years, D. rapae has been imported into the United States from regions throughout the world for D. noxia classical biological control. Knowledge of the alternative hosts of D. rapae could be useful for identifying ecosystems into which the parasitoid could be released at times when D. noxia is absent. Over 30 aphid species are listed as hosts of D. rapae (Mackauer and Stary 1967). This host list, though comprehensive, is a compilation of information gathered from diverse, mostly unrelated sources, and does not necessarily depict the host range of any particular population. Host range differs among populations of some aphidiid species collected from different regions or from different hosts in the same region (Powell 1986). Thus, published host lists can be misleading if they are the sole source of information used to determine acceptable alternative hosts on which to release prospective candidates in classical biocontrol programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative suitability of several aphid species common to agricultural and associated non-agricultural ecosystems in the Great Plains as hosts for this Syrian D. rapae isolate in laboratory no-choice tests.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1994

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References

Birch, L.C. 1948. The intrinsic rate of increase of an insect population. Journal of Animal Ecology 17: 1526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hofsvang, T. 1991. Fecundity of aphid parasitoids in the family Aphidiidae (Hymenoptera). (A review). pp. 41–44 in Polgar, L., Chambers, R.J., Dixon, A.F.G., and Hodek, I. (Eds.), Behaviour and Impact of Aphidophaga. SPB Academic Publishing bv, The Hague. 350 pp.Google Scholar
Mackauer, M., and Stary, P.. 1967. Hym. Ichneumonidea, World Aphidiidae. pp. 85–87 in Delucchi, V., and Remaudière, G. (Eds.), Index of Entomophagous Insects. Le Francois, Paris. 167 pp.Google Scholar
Milne, W.M. 1991. Host-change in Aphidius ervi. pp. 51–60 in Polgar, L., Chambers, R.J., Dixon, A.F.G., and Hodek, I. (Eds.), Behaviour and Impact of Aphidophaga. SPB Academic Publishing bv, The Hague. 350 pp.Google Scholar
Powell, W. 1986. Enhancing parasitoids in crops. pp. 319–340 in Waage, J., and Greathead, D. (Eds.), Insect Parasitoids. Academic Press, London. 389 pp.Google Scholar

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HOST SPECIES EFFECTS ON PARASITIZATION BY A SYRIAN POPULATION OF DIAERETIELLA RAPAE M’INTOSH (HYMENOPTERA: APHIDIIDAE)
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HOST SPECIES EFFECTS ON PARASITIZATION BY A SYRIAN POPULATION OF DIAERETIELLA RAPAE M’INTOSH (HYMENOPTERA: APHIDIIDAE)
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HOST SPECIES EFFECTS ON PARASITIZATION BY A SYRIAN POPULATION OF DIAERETIELLA RAPAE M’INTOSH (HYMENOPTERA: APHIDIIDAE)
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