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DIURNAL PATTERNS IN YELLOW TRAP CATCH OF PEAR PSYLLA (HOMOPTERA: PSYLLIDAE): DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SEXES AND MORPHOTYPES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

David R. Horton
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, 3706 West Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima, Washington, USA 98902

Abstract

Diumal patterns in yellow sticky trap catch of pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola Foerster, are described for the spring (reproductive) winterform generation, summerforms, and the fall (diapausing/dispersing) winterform generation. For each life stage, trap catch of the two sexes is also compared, and sex ratios on sticky traps are contrasted with independent estimates of population sex ratio obtained by beat tray samples. Beat tray estimates of sex ratio showed a slight male bias for both winterform generations (although P = 0.09 for spring winterforms), and a female bias for the summerform samples. Sticky trap catches were significantly male biased for the reproductive generations (i.e. spring winterforms and summerforms). Trap catches of fall winterforms were not different from a 1:1 ratio. The male bias for the reproductive generations may be due to mate-seeking activities of males or to a decrease in activity by egg-laden females. Peak catch for summerforms occurred in the morning, and that of both winter-form generations occurred at midday. There was no evidence that trapping depleted local densities of psylla during a 24-h period.

Résumé

Les variations quotidiennes des captures de Psylles du poirier (Cacopsylla pyricola Foerster) sur les pièges collants jaunes ont été évaluées chez la génération de printemps (reproductrice) de la forme d’hiver, chez les formes d’été et chez la génération d’automne (phases de diapause/dispersion) de la forme d’hiver. Pour chacun des stades, le nombre de mâles et de femelles capturés a été déterminé, et les rapports mâles : femelles sur les pièges ont été comparés à ceux obtenus dans des cuvettes de battage au cours d’estimations de la population. Les rapports mâles : femelles obtenus par battage se sont avérés légèrement supérieurs à 1 chez les deux générations de la forme d’hiver (mais P = 0,09 dans le cas des formes d’hiver du printemps) et légèrement inférieurs à 1 chez les formes d’été. Les captures obtenues sur les pièges collants comptaient un nombre significativement plus élevé de mâles chez les générations reproductrices (i.e. formes d’hiver du printemps et formes d’été). Sur les pièges collants, le rapport mâles : femelles des formes d’hiver d’automne ne différait pas de 1 : 1. Les rapports supérieurs à 1 chez les générations reproductrices peuvent être attribuables à l’activité accrue des mâles à la recherche de femelles ou à la diminution de l’activité des femelles alourdies par leurs oeufs. C’est le matin que les pièges recueillaient le plus d’insectes dans le cas des formes d’été, et au milieu de la journée, dans le cas des deux générations de formes d’hiver. Un piégeage de 24 h ne semble pas avoir réduit les densités totales des populations locales de psylles.

[Traduit par la rédaction]

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1993

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DIURNAL PATTERNS IN YELLOW TRAP CATCH OF PEAR PSYLLA (HOMOPTERA: PSYLLIDAE): DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SEXES AND MORPHOTYPES
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DIURNAL PATTERNS IN YELLOW TRAP CATCH OF PEAR PSYLLA (HOMOPTERA: PSYLLIDAE): DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SEXES AND MORPHOTYPES
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