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CONTROLLED-RELEASE SEX PHEROMONE LURES FOR MONITORING SPRUCE BUDWORM POPULATIONS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

C.J. Sanders
Affiliation:
Canadian Forestry Service, Great Lakes Forestry Centre, PO Box 490, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada P6A 5M7
E.A. Meighen
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, 3655 Drummond Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1Y6

Abstract

Five formulations of the primary sex pheromone components of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana [Clem.]) were evaluated as lures for monitoring spruce budworm populations: Biolures (Consep Membranes Inc.), Luretape plastic flakes (Hercon, Healthchem Corp.), polyethylene vials (International Pheromone Systems), hollow fibers (Albany International), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pellets. PVC pellets showed significant loss in attractiveness over the required 6-week period. Also, different batches of PVC pellets had very different rates of pheromone release and attraction; the oldest lures, stored for the longest period, were the most attractive. Luretape caught fewer moths than anticipated from the release-rate data and showed wide variation in catch among individual lures. Fibers were inconsistent. Biolures and polyethylene vials showed the lowest decline in attractiveness over time and the lowest variation in catch among individual lures, but their capture rates were higher than necessary.

Résumé

Cinq formulations des principaux constituants du bouquet des phéromones sexuelles de la tordeuse des bourgeons de l’épinette (Choristoneura fumiferana [Clem.]) ont été évaluées pour la surveillance des populations de cet insecte par piégeage. Il s’agissait des Biolures (Consep Membranes Inc.), des flocons de plastique Luretape (Hercon, Healthchem Corp.), de fioles de polyéthylène (International Pheromone Systems), de fibres creuses (Albany International) et de pastilles de polychlorure de vinyle (PVC). Sur la période requise de 6 semaines, il y a eu perte importante des propriétés attractives des pastilles de PVC. De plus, la vitesse de libération des phéromones et l’effet d’attraction variaient énormément d’un lot de pastilles à l’autre; les plus vieux appâts, entreposés durant les plus longues périodes, étaient les plus efficaces. Le Luretape a permis de capturer un nombre de tordeuses adultes inférieur à celui qui avait été prévu par les données sur la vitesse de libération, et le nombre de captures variaient largement d’un appât à l’autre. Le rendement des fibres a été inconstant. Les Biolures et les fioles de polyéthylène se sont révélés dotés de l’effet attractif qui s’affaiblissait le moins dans le temps, et la variation du nombre de captures d’un appât à l’autre était la moins grande, même si ce nombre était plus élevé qu’il le fallait.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1987

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References

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